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Thread: Shopping for the .260 Remington.

  1. #1
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    Question Shopping for the .260 Remington.

    So I'm beginning to think about an all around Bolt action, and have been learning about the .260 Remington.

    It seems to be all I need in a rifle cartridge as far as a non (current, but may someday, you never know.)) hunter, mostly range shooter, not going to Alaska or Africa anytime soon, light kicking with great accuracy and power retention (Thanks for the help 9mmepiphany).

    Problem is I am not seeing many rifle companies supporting this round. Remington has one Special Edition 700 for it, and can't find it on Savage or Howa's sites.

    Ruger has it listed, but only in that short barreled model and that is not what I want.

    Do these only come out in seasonal runs or is there something more to it?

    Thank you all,

    RFB

  2. #2
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    Robert;

    For some reason Remington decided to reinvent the wheel with the .260. The reason you're having difficulty finding a platform is almost certainly because the cartridge recapitulates the 6.5 Swede, which is vastly more popular. Most firearms manufacturers aren't going to make two platforms, one of which is very sellable & the other is a marginal seller at best, if there's no overiding reason to do so.

    Check out the CZ550, or the Tikka, in 6.5 Swede, those you can find. There are New Haven Winchester model 70's in Swede. I believe the 1994 Remington 700 Classic was in Swede, and there are certainly other modern bolt action guns out there in Swede also.

    I think Remington thought to take advantage of the short action craze & put essentially the same ballistics as the 6.5 X 55 Swedish Mauser in a shorter case. It hasn't exactly taken off like a moonshot. More like Nieuport 17 with it's weird-Alice rotary radial engine & all.

    I hope this gives you enough information in able to find what you want, albeit in a slightly different round.

    900F
    Birth Certificate? What birth certificate? He don't need no steenkink birth certificate!

  3. #3
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    Nice choice on the 260. It is an excellent caliber.

    I am not quite sure why many manufacturers do not have it in their regular lineup. Remington does not even have it as a regularly catalogued item, even though they created this round. This caliber is extremely popular amongst target shooters, very accurate and low recoil. It might be that the american market prefers bigger bullets, 30 cal and above. Most of the people I hunt with are always big on big bullets. Keep in mind the 6.5 is commonly used in Europe for large game as well.

    Sako and Tikka have rifles available in 260. Sako is a little expensive, but Tikka is quite reasonable. If you have the initiative, you can buy a Savage action, and put one together yourself. I hear they are really easy to assemble, and there will still be a cost savings.

    Good luck.
    Last edited by woo18; November 9th, 2008 at 02:32 PM.

  4. #4
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    Don't forget about the custom route. Get the rifle built exactly to your specs and in the caliber of your choice. Of course, it requires a bit more investment than the others.

    Ed

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    this is the same prob as no one in the u.s. makes a 762.39 rifle,except cz.
    Why? ammo , my man, ammo. american x39 ammo not only sucks, but is not made to fire in x39 rifles worth a damn, becuase it does not use the same dimensions as foreign made bbls. also american made x39 ammo is 3 times as much.
    Now then, 260 ammo is not also a foreign made ammo, but the ammo made here , costs an arm and a leg, which is stupid since it is 308 ammo, with a 6.5 bullet, which there are a ton of out there.
    So they go ahead, and charge 25 to 30 bucks a box for ammo, for rifles that aren't being made. Real smart. They think they can make their money just selling the ammo , because it is so superior to all other ammo out there, in regards to it's abilility for hunting, accuracy , and long range paper punching.
    We don't need to sell rifles as well, let's just make our money off the ammo!!!
    Good thinking during a recession...
    Go with the 6.5 swede, by cz, or many other companies. It is just as good, it is much cheaper, and it is not only new made by several companies, but you can find milsurp for it, from guys like Amunitiontogo.com or others, and it is even cheaper. Plus 6.5 milsurp is generally swedish made, and you know they made their ammo as close to match grade as possible, just the way the swedes do things.

  6. #6
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    Why not go for the 7mm-08? Better ballistics, less recoil and a better selection of ammo.
    PROUD TO BE A VETERAN

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    Sorry, but I say this as a big fan of 7mm cartridges, the 7mm-08 isn't in the same league as the .260 for long range shooting. You can get higher BC bullets for the .260 which makes it a dream to shoot at 600 and 1000 yards.

    One way to go is get a used Savage, then add a good barrel, which is easy to do yourself. McGowan and Shilen both make drop in .260 barrels for the Savage.
    Browningguy
    Houston, TX

  8. #8
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    My sister-in-law shoots a .260 Rem and took a nice deer with it last weekend. Her rifle is a custom job that her husband had built on a Remington 700 action.

    It seems to be a nice little cartridge and I wish Savage would bring out the chambering in their line. The .260 would be a natural step between the .243 and the 7mm-08.

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    Robert,

    Don't forget Remington's Model Seven - the CDL model is available in .260. Kimber also chambers their 84M for this cartridge.

    I'm pretty sure that Remington has produced the M700 Mountain Rifle in .260 in the recent past, so you might try finding one of those.
    "'Out where ranges are long, you need (here substitute your favorite brand name) performance.' Balderdash. Out where ranges are long, you need to know how to shoot." - Jeff Cooper

  10. #10
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    Thanks everyone, its good to know its just not me and my inexperience.

    A little help with a conversion, since I am in NO rush for this acquisition (paper hunting is year 'round. ) I am really considering buying an available rifle and the .260 barrel, unless one already chambered returns in '09.

    I think I read somewhere that since it is a 6.5 bullet on a .308 case you buy a .308 rifle and then change barrels? Or is there a better way of doing it?

    I am also trying to get away with all this for (near) as little as possible, because although the .260 sounds great...I'll have a hard time justifying spending over $1,000 on this project, due to how little I shoot rifles in general.

    I'd have to say this(a Beautiful rifle!) is the upper $ limit of what I want, and a Savage 10 or Tikka T3? would be my lower dollar limit.

    Anyhow, great job guys!

    RFB

  11. #11
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    Ruger used to chamber the standard size (22") Mk II in .260. There's one on gunbroker for $499.

    The Browning A-Bolt is also made in .260.

  12. #12
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    go with the Savage. Although it is quite inexpensive, it has the performance of 3K gun. Moreover, the barrel is user changeable, and actually quite easy.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by RobertFBurnett
    I think I read somewhere that since it is a 6.5 bullet on a .308 case you buy a .308 rifle and then change barrels? Or is there a better way of doing it?
    That is usually how it's done. My own .260 started out as a .308 Win rifle and was rebarreled with a 6.5mm barrel chambered for the .260 cartridge. It didn't require any changes to the bolt or the magazine. I'm pretty sure a .243 or 7mm-08 rifle would work too, since they're also based on the .308 case.
    "'Out where ranges are long, you need (here substitute your favorite brand name) performance.' Balderdash. Out where ranges are long, you need to know how to shoot." - Jeff Cooper

  14. #14
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    Yep. Shouldn't have any trouble finding the exact rifle that you want in .308 either.

    Another plus is that you can practice for less money (factory loads), or more conveniently (no resizing brass) until you get good enough to notice the drawbacks of the 175gr .308, then once you switch the barrel over to .260, you'll be really good.

    I don't know you and don't know your skill, but it's just an idea. I figure if a decent .308 barrel comes brand new, you might as well dirty it up and use it a bit before tossing it into "the pile".

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