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Thread: Rifled slugs from .410 full choke?

  1. #1
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    Rifled slugs from .410 full choke?

    anyone have any accuracy when shooting rifled slugs from a .410 full choke? I have a Springfield Armory M6:



    it has the .410 barrel with a permenent full choke. i currently shoot regular shotshells and 000 buck but would like to give a try with the rifled slugs. any info would be appreciated. -------- Eric
    "Every normal man must be tempted at times to spit on his hands, hoist the black flag, and begin slitting throats."
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    The only way to know for sure is to try it. If the choke restriction is pefectly concentric with the barrel diameter it should shoot true, but if it's just a little off it could throw the slug slightly to one side. A very small difference might not show up when using shot, but it can have an effect on a slug.

    That's one of the reasons why every shotgun is a puzzle unto itself.

  3. #3
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    Just some friendly advice, I really wouldn't recommend using a .410 slug on anything bigger than a coyote. Yes, some people have harvested deer with them. Some people have also taken deer with .22 LR, doesn't make that a good idea either.

    http://www.brassfetcher.com/Winchest...ed%20slug.html

    From what I've seen, all of the 1/5 oz. slugs and most of the 1/4 oz. ones perform about like that. 100% fragmentation, and around 5" penetration. Basically, a load to use on small-medium animals that you're not planning to eat.

    You could get a bunch of gallon jugs or other containers of water and shoot those to see if you can find a particular brand of slug that doesn't break up, though. You'd want it to penetrate 3-4 1 gallon jugs back to back, for it to be acceptable against deer or humans.

    Probably better off sticking with the 000 buck, though. That stuff's great, as long as it patterns well through your gun. http://www.brassfetcher.com/Winchest...et%20buck.html
    He hit the ground, the sound was splat, his blood went spurting high
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    I've never understood why .410 slugs are so tiny (1/5 to 1/4 ounce) while 20 gauge slugs are 5/8 to 3/4 oz. The small size plus the high velocity (1800 fps) are probably why they fragment so much on impact.

    The shot loads aren't as drastically different as the slug sizes. Typical .410 loads run from 1/2 to 3/4 ounces while standard 20 gauge are usually 7/8 or 1 ounce.

    I would think it would be possible to load a 1/2 ounce or so slug for a .410 with a bit lower velocity. I'm guessing a load like that would actually penetrate much better and be more useful, especially for HD purposes.

    Maybe someone can enlighten us as to why .410 slugs are so tiny.

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    Actually, before you go an fire a slug through a full choke, I would advise that you cut a slug from the gun, and see if it will fit through that full choke with not much force. If you have the means I would check the muzzle end of the gun with a dial or electronic caliper and then check to see the size of the slug.. to see what kind of fit you are going to have. If it's close (few thousanths of an inch under) then you will be good to go. If it's within + nor - .001" I'd say it is likely ok..

    If the slug is more than a few thousanths over the size of the full choke, I'd likely advise against it.

    That's just me though..

  6. #6
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    I've fired slugs through my M6. I can get a group at 15 yards, put everything I fire at least on the paper at 25 yards but can't hit anything except the backstop at 50.

    I've never shot at anything that has a heartbeat with .410 slugs but I do believe what I hear about them. I think in a survival situation they'd be okay for medium game and self defense.

    You might look for Brenneke slugs, I understand they hold together a little better than the Foster slugs. If you do try them let us know!

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    Generally speaking you do not want to use slugs in barrels with chokes tighter than Modified ... slugs in a full choke barrel ... the pressure will be higher, hence more recoil, but they are tough little guns.

    To be on the safe side, check with the mfg. either directly or via their web site before you try it.
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  8. #8
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    I've been getting 4" groups at 50 yds with Winchester 2 1/2" slugs through a full choke in my mossberg 183.
    Foster slugs are designed to compress to fit the bore, and are safe through a full choke.
    A similar thread on the other board brought a response from Mcb, who has done some extensive testing with .410 slugs.
    His site is here: http://mcb-homis.com/index410.html
    hth

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    The Foster style slugs are safe to shoot through any choke constriction. It should tell you this right on the box if you read the box. I know most don't bother, it is kind of like reading the instructions.

    They are very soft and they are hollow based.

    Safe, though, says NOTHING about accuracy.

    Best slug accuracy is generally in cylinder bore and improved cylinder with a few guns shooting well with modified (usually a more "open" modified) chokes.

    For those saying "you would be better off with buckshot than a slug in a .410 bore" please be aware that a .410 bore shotgun with a slug is a legal deer weapon in Ohio, but NO buckshot or bird shot is permitted at all! Foster slug, Brenneke slug, Sabot slug or pumpkin ball (all single projectiles) are legal for the shotguns, but NOTHING else.

    Buckshot

  10. #10
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    MCB

    What CH said. And that MCB website is VERY informative.

    Good hunting.

  11. #11
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    Good data on that website. The Brenneke .410s look like they would be adequate for small-ish deer, if they're accurate through your gun.
    He hit the ground, the sound was splat, his blood went spurting high
    His comrades they were heard to say "a helluva way to die"
    He lay there rolling round in the welter of his gore
    And he ain't gonna jump no more

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