Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 30

Thread: Gun Safe- a few questions

  1. #1
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    05-07-08
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    221

    Gun Safe- a few questions

    Hey guys,
    I finally made the commitment and bought a gun safe. It's 833lbs empty. It's on it's way here now from across the country and should be here sometime this week. There's only one problem.... I can't find anybody with a dolly that will be able to handle the weight. There's a few safe companies in town but they are charging an arm and a leg because I didn't buy the safe from them. Other's are charging me $100 just to borrow the dolly for an hour!!! I've read from others that the Uhaul appliance dolly can handle the weight even though it states not to use on items over 500lbs. Anybody have any experience here???

    Last question, does the hole that is drilled into the safe for the electric cord of the GoldenRod, compromise any fire security??? I was wondering how a safe that is supposed to be fire proof for an hour or 30 mins, is supposed to accomplish this with a hole drilled into the side??? Wouldn't this compromise the seal to keep heat out??? Am I missing something here?

    Thanks for any info guys.
    EHL

  2. #2
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    12-22-06
    Posts
    603
    Any stairs to navigate?

    Shouldn't the company delivering the safe bring it into your house?

    Assuming you've got stairs and a delivery to the driveway or sidewalk only, then I'd pay for the special dolly. Rather than an appliance dolly, look for one designed to move soda and candy machines. These will handle the safe and I can't image they'd be $100/hour.

    Not sure how the hole for an electric line effects the fire rating.

  3. #3
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    05-07-08
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    221
    No stairs to navigate at all. The safe company only pays for a delivery guy to unload the safe in my driveway. Nothing else. So it's up to me to get it inside.

  4. #4
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    01-09-07
    Location
    Nebraska
    Posts
    113
    If you are going into a basement here is how I have done 3 so far. This requires the garage door to be a straight shot down the basement stairs.

    ********THIS IS NOT NECESSARILY SAFE AND I TAKE NO RESPONSIBILITY FOR IT********

    1) Put carpet down over anything that may scratch the safe including the floor and any sills if your stairs are carpeted. If your step into the landing is elevated put a piece of rubber over the sill so that when you tip the safe it h as something to grab onto and won't slide backwards.
    2) Take the door off if at all possible. My safe door weighs 260lbs on a 885lb safe
    3) Move the safe over to the doorway using a pallet jack and line it up so when you tilt the safe over you are laying it on its side. It will be going down top first but if you get the door off 650lbs is not hard to flip over with 4 guys at the bottom of the stairs.
    4) Back a vehicle with a ball hitch into the garage lining the ball up with the center of the doorway.
    5) Put AT LEAST one heavy duty tie down strap around the safe and secure it making sure to putt padding under the steel surfaces so as to not scratch the safe.
    6) Tie a heavy duty rope to the strap(s) and wrap it one time around the ball hitch on the vehicle you have backed into the garage.
    7) Tilt the safe over so it is laying flat in the landing to go down your stairs.
    8) Start pushing the safe to the tipping point on the stairs. If someone wants to be on the bottom they do so AT THEIR OWN RISK. It is very scary to be on the bottom. I know and won't be doing it again.
    9) The rope and ball hitch act a a block and tackle sort of and you just use the weight of the safe and gravity to get it down the stairs. The person(s) on the rope slowly release it so that it goes down the stairs in a controlled manner.
    10) Once at the bottom lay the safe over on its side again and flip it so that it is right side up and then move it around. If it's tile, concrete, or carpet little sections of pipe work otherwise I have used carpet turned upside down to move it with a guy pulling on the carpet and steering and the others pushing.

    ***NOTE*** If at all possible use 2 straps, 2 ropes, and 2 vehicles so that you have a safety net if one breaks. I didn't do that on the last one and was on the bottom initially guiding it down the stairs but bailed as soon as it started coming straight down. THIS THING COULD SERVERLY HURT OR KILL YOU SO BE CAREFULL!!!!
    An armed man is a citizen, an unarmed man a subject, and a disarmed man a slave. Which do you want to be?

  5. #5
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    01-09-07
    Location
    Nebraska
    Posts
    113
    Since I see there are no stairs use pipes or carpet sections to move it. Another option is flexible plastic sections to slide it on. If you could get a pallet jack in your house that would be even easier. If you use the pipe method you should be able to get over the door sill without too much trouble as long as the pipe is the right diameter.

    Most companys in my area won't move the safe either. I even bought it locally and he still didn't want to as he is an older gentleman and there is just too much liability.

    They also have carts that hold safes at a 45 degree angle to make it easier. My safe dealer has a couple of those but with my basement requirements that wasn't an option.
    An armed man is a citizen, an unarmed man a subject, and a disarmed man a slave. Which do you want to be?

  6. #6
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    12-22-06
    Posts
    603
    I think if you've got no stairs and all level ground, a heavy duty U-Haul type dolly might do it. Get a STRONG friend to help!

  7. #7
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    05-24-08
    Posts
    241
    An 800 pound safe will need pro grade equipment and knowledge. Treat it just like a pop machine, and remember, they have "tip over" stickers on them because they can and will kill you if it falls over.

    Floor loads are signifcant. It needs to rest over a major foundation wall or beam. A concrete slab floor may still crack. Any carpet underneath will be permanently compressed. Once down, it won't be moved - pick the spot you plan to get used to.

    Basically, the point load is much heavier than a baby grand piano, and lots of thought needs to be given to movement and placement.

  8. #8
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    02-04-03
    Location
    Piedmont, NC
    Posts
    962
    I bet if you offer to tip the delivery guy $40-50.00, he will find it in his heart to wheel it into your house.

  9. #9
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    12-13-05
    Location
    Between Idaho and Montana
    Posts
    209
    Think Plywood and Golf balls. (Seriously) The Golf Balls let you move the safe into tight places since you can roll it on them. The Ply wood protects tile/hardwood/and carpeting. Depending on Where it goes is the hardest part. You should be able to rent a dolly cheaper than that. Check home depot.

  10. #10
    Member  
    Join Date
    12-01-05
    Location
    Colo & WA
    Posts
    57
    You can use sections of pipe rather than golf balls.

    Any machine shop will have a dolly.

    A small hole will not allow enough heat in a fire to be a problem. It is the transfer of a lot of heat thru a big flat surface that damages the contents.

  11. #11
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    02-03-08
    Location
    Kilgore, TX
    Posts
    1,238
    Check out fire caulk http://www.shop3m.com/98040054565.ht...-barrier-caulk. Good stuff.
    “When you understand the nature of a thing, you know what it is capable of.”
    -Miyamoto Musashi

    "Some of the worst things imaginable have been done with the best intentions."

  12. #12
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    04-22-06
    Posts
    344
    best off paying the pros to do this the right way, back surgery is more expensive and more painful than paying a few extra bucks to have the safe moved right
    Because of their tremendous reputation, the soldiers of the old guard were permitted liberties which would not have been tolerated in other units. When Napoleon met Tsar Alexander of Russia at Tilsit in 1807 he pointed to a terribly scarred Grenadier. "What do you think of men who can endure such wounds?" he asked. " and what do you think of men who can inflict them?" replied the Tsar. "They're all dead!" interjected the Grenadier, settling the issue once and for all.

  13. #13
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    01-07-03
    Location
    MT
    Posts
    125
    I second the "don't do this unless you're a trained professional" idea. Also, unless you've cut a special deal, delivery services are required to bring the item only to your door. You can imagine liability issues for all involved once they step inside. Well, the PI lawyers anyway can imagine them quite well. I bought my safe from a dealer here in Montana. Because he tours the state and delivers I didn't have to deal with the move. They used a multi-articulated hand truck of some sort to get it up the 7 stairs to the front porch, and once inside discarded that for a series of PVC pipes. It was kind of like the Egyptian slaves rolling the stone blocks up to the pyramids. This was done by the company owner and his rather diminutive wife. Three right-angle turns to get it into a back room against a load-bearing wall.

    Later, when I had to move the safe for a house remodel I elected to put it in the basement. If you have a basement and can do this I recommend it highly. Let me know if you need an explanation of why this location is a good one. Anyway, the safe movers had long since retuned to their northern Montana home 400 miles away, I hired one of the local moving companies to take the safe down, and specified that they should also be experienced piano movers. It was about $100 to have 3 or 4 burly college students and one foreman do the work. but as was said above, it was a hell of a lot cheaper than back surgery.

  14. #14
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    02-22-03
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    2,502
    EHL;

    The pallet jack is your friend.

    900F
    Birth Certificate? What birth certificate? He don't need no steenkink birth certificate!

  15. #15
    New Member  
    Join Date
    08-09-07
    Posts
    3
    Three 1" wooden dowels did it for me. Moved my 800 lb safe by myself using only that. I didn't have carpeting to deal with and I'd imagine it'd bunch it up if you used them on carpet. Works better than you'd think and it's cheap.

  16. #16
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    12-26-02
    Location
    Occupied Montanistan
    Posts
    11,489
    Think Plywood and Golf balls. (Seriously) The Golf Balls let you move the safe into tight places since you can roll it on them. The Ply wood protects tile/hardwood/and carpeting.
    That would take a lot of balls
    Governments don't live together. People live together.

  17. #17
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    02-15-03
    Location
    A small town in California
    Posts
    571
    Rent a dolly from Uhaul. I moved my safe(1200#) on 3/4" pvc cut to the length of the safes width. Just cut 6 lenghts and roll one and then another until you have 4-5 under the safe. When one comes out put another one under the safe. Works good.
    ...mercy to the guilty is cruelty to the innocent...

  18. #18
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    10-31-05
    Location
    Southeast Michigan
    Posts
    1,507
    I second the "don't do this unless you're a trained professional" idea.
    Can I third it?

    A few months ago, I bought a safe and paid to have it installed. I am glad I did. I never could have gotten it through a too narrow door or around one tight corner even using the techniques suggested.
    “It is usually futile to try to talk facts and analysis to people who are enjoying a sense of moral superiority in their ignorance.”
    — Thomas Sowell

  19. #19
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    05-20-08
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    692
    I like bullet bobs suggestion.
    NRA life member, Support Our Troops,
    Pointman Ministries Member
    MMCDC Member

  20. #20
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    01-09-07
    Location
    Nebraska
    Posts
    113
    I would have been willing to pay someone a couple hundred dollars to move mine but that doesn't mean anything when nobody is willing to do it. I called everywhere within 50 miles and nobody would so it was left up to me. Just be smart and careful and if you absolutely don't feel comfortable doing it DON'T DO IT. That answer sucks but leave it in the garage until you can figure out what to do.
    An armed man is a citizen, an unarmed man a subject, and a disarmed man a slave. Which do you want to be?

  21. #21
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    05-20-08
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    692
    Hey, what about going to the local high school football coach? Explain your situation. If he can get a few guys to help out buy them pizza or give them some cash for their troubles. Just a thought.
    NRA life member, Support Our Troops,
    Pointman Ministries Member
    MMCDC Member

  22. #22
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    07-21-05
    Location
    St. Charles, MO (St. Louis)
    Posts
    596
    Hey, what about going to the local high school football coach? Explain your situation. If he can get a few guys to help out buy them pizza or give them some cash for their troubles. Just a thought.
    A local school district contacted me in regards to removing a few old vault doors they needed to remove for a remodel. They were light doors, trashed over the years, and the shop teacher wanted to use the steel for his class projects. They probably weighed about 1,000 pounds each, and had to go up a straight wide flight of about 20 stairs.

    They decided that it would be cheaper to have the football team do it. The door got away from one of them, and one of the players had his leg broken. They are really lucky that the 1,000 pound door racing down those stairs didn't kill anybody.

    The football player is now suing the school. I'm sure it'll end up costing them somewhere into the six figures. We were going to charge $800.
    Safe Sales, Service, & Delivery
    Commercial - Residential - Gun Safes
    www.zykansafe.com

  23. #23
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    12-26-02
    Location
    Live Free or Die, Baby!
    Posts
    4,943
    I'm sure it'll end up costing them somewhere into the six figures. We were going to charge $800.
    Now that's what you call Penny-Wise, Pound-Foolish.
    Eloi-- Tastes Like Chicken

  24. #24
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    02-22-03
    Location
    Mitchi-gun
    Posts
    3,478
    Something over 800 lbs, I'd have professionally done for sure. Mine was 600, I used a reefer dolly, and it was still a real PITA for 2 and a half of us. I could only imagine what another 200 lbs would be like.
    "Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable.".......John F. Kennedy

  25. #25
    New Member  
    Join Date
    04-25-07
    Location
    Athol, ID.
    Posts
    27
    Furniture dollies....I have a 1000# Fort Knox and have moved it three times.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •