Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: Buddhism and arms

  1. #1
    Administrator   
    Join Date
    12-19-02
    Location
    Nashville, TN
    Posts
    10,433

    Buddhism and arms

    I was looking up details of Buddhism and found a note which seems to hold weapons incompatible with it. Given the tradition of warrior monks in China and Japan, I wonder how they reconciled the teachings with the practices.

    The five types of businesses that are harmful to undertake are
    Business in weapons: trading in all kinds of weapons and instruments for killing
    [...]
    Oleg Volk
    A Human Right | Blog

  2. #2
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    02-18-08
    Location
    North Central Montana, across the Wide Missouri
    Posts
    1,096
    Buddhism is not a large religion in either China or Japan. Japan is mostly Shinto, and China is Tao and Confusian.(sp)

  3. #3
    Administrator   
    Join Date
    11-19-03
    Location
    AZ
    Posts
    13,086
    Yes, Shinto and Tao, (Taoist monks are often the ones portrayed in really bad movies), are the warrior religons.
    If total government control equals safety, why are prisons so dangerous?

    http://czforumsite.info/

  4. #4
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    06-29-06
    Posts
    586
    I believe that trafficking is arms and deadly instruments is looked down upon but the Dalai Lama himself has said that if someone were trying to harm you it would not be wrong for you to take up arms and defend yourself
    "Hokey religions and ancient weapons are no match for a good blaster at your side."

  5. #5
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    12-26-02
    Location
    Live Free or Die, Baby!
    Posts
    4,943
    My understanding is that the weapons were used by the Shaolin as defensive, and were therefore ok.
    Eloi-- Tastes Like Chicken

  6. #6
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    06-19-08
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    1,783
    From my limited understanding it breaks down like this...

    You don't see Buddhist monks carrying "weapons." You see them carrying walking staves and other normal tools of everyday life. All non-edged.

    When they use the staff to defend themself they engage in somewhat the same reasoning as we do when we say we don't shoot to kill, but if our most effective shot to stop, to the center mass, does happen to kill someone... well, it wasn't our intent.

  7. #7
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    12-26-02
    Location
    Occupied Montanistan
    Posts
    11,489
    One of our neighbors is a Buddhist.

    Nice lady. I've never talked to her about guns specifically, but I know she doesn't mind when her husband shoots at the coyotes that are killing her $2000 cats.
    Governments don't live together. People live together.

  8. #8
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    08-25-04
    Location
    virginia
    Posts
    488
    And from the same wiki article comes the information on right effort *
    (i) There is the case where a monk generates desire, endeavors, activates persistence, upholds and exerts his intent for the sake of the non-arising of evil, unskillful qualities that have not yet arisen.
    Using an article as a weapon in order to prevent the arising of evil would be within this category

    (ii) He generates desire, endeavors, activates persistence, upholds and exerts his intent for the sake of the abandonment of evil, unskillful qualities that have arisen.
    Using an article as a weapon in order to persuade another to abandon evil would be within this category

    (iii) He generates desire, endeavors, activates persistence, upholds and exerts his intent for the sake of the arising of skillful qualities that have not yet arisen.
    Practice with an article that could be used, among other things, as a weapon, would be within this category. The practice with firearms to seek "perfection" in the manipulation of the item (target shooting or self-defense) also would be within this category

    (iv) He generates desire, endeavors, activates persistence, upholds and exerts his intent for the maintenance, non-confusion, increase, plenitude, development, and culmination of skillful qualities that have arisen
    See comments in iii above - merely a higher level of activity

    As has been said many times, many ways, it is not the object that is evil, but the manner in which the object is used. This fully comports with Buddhist philosophy.

    * I am not a Buddhist, and it has been many years since my last Comparative Religions seminar. However, I offer my humble opinions because I am not an expert, so that others may discuss that which is seen as differing from their interpretation(s).

    stay safe.

    skidmark
    While it may be fun to soar with the eagles, no weasel has ever been sucked into a jet intake. ((c), TM/SM 19xx - 20xx)

  9. #9
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    05-20-07
    Location
    Prescott, AZ, USA
    Posts
    562
    The branch of Buddhism to which I belong has a long history of using Buddhist practice to perfect skills with various weapons, most notably in archery (see Eugen Herrigel's Zen and the Art of Archery). Zen tends to be less reliant on such things as the Eightfold Path than, say, Theravada, though the basic concepts are the same.

  10. #10
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    01-06-03
    Posts
    4,109
    "If someone has a gun and is trying to kill you, it would be reasonable to shoot back with your own gun."
    Dalai Lama

    "Educating Heart Summit," Portland, OR, asked by a girl about school shootings

    Seattle Times, 15 May 2001
    Vae Victis

  11. #11
    Member  
    Join Date
    01-15-08
    Location
    upstate ny
    Posts
    97
    thanks, CWL, for the attribution on the quote about the dalai lama

    i have seen it mentioned many times before but didnt know
    the when and where of the statement

    it helps to know that.....

  12. #12
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    09-26-08
    Location
    Jacksonville, FL
    Posts
    167
    viewing 'Buddhism' as representing all the various faiths that it includes is about as difficult as viewing Judaism, Christianity, and Islam as being on monolithic faith because they all spring from the same roots.
    "ours is not to wonder why,
    ours is but to shoot the guy.

    GSGT RD, USMC circa 1982

  13. #13
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    12-21-05
    Location
    Sachse, Texas
    Posts
    869
    oops
    יזכר לא עד פעם (Remember. Never Again.)

  14. #14
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    11-16-06
    Location
    Woodbridge, VA
    Posts
    605
    I had figured it was as Ramone says... You can't be any more descriptive saying "Christian" than you would be by saying "car", and I expected "Buddhist" to be the same.

    My grandfather was a Quaker - a Quaker who killed Nazis. He belonged to a sect different from the titular one.
    Don't blame me, I voted for Ron Paul!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •