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Thread: Hunter's bullet grazes 2 kids at Mich. day care

  1. #1
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    Hunter's bullet grazes 2 kids at Mich. day care

    Sorry if this has been posted already....

    BENTON TOWNSHIP, Mich. — Authorities in Wisconsin say a hunter's stray bullet has grazed two young boys at a day care near Cheboygan.

    The Cheboygan County sheriff's department says a 43-year-old woman fired her rifle at a deer on Thursday but the bullet penetrated a wall and grazed the boys — ages 3 and 5 — inside Angie's Country Kids Day Care in Benton Township.

    The Petoskey-News Review reports they were released from a hospital after treatment.

    Authorities say the woman was hunting about 400 yards away, and may not have realized there was a day care in the area.

    The county prosecutor's office is expected to review the case.
    http://www.comcast.net/articles/news...llet.Day.Care/
    “Guns are not the problem … crazy is the problem” Jon Stewart from Oprah interview, Sept 2010.

  2. #2
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    Grazed? Is that closer to "creased" or "parted the hair of?"

    Otherwise, sounds like a violation of Rule 4 to me. Not good.

  3. #3
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    Idiot. People like that are what give us a bad name.
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  4. #4
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    Dang, thank God it didn't actually hit the kids.

  5. #5
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    Somehow there seems a lot of "information" not included.

  6. #6
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    I agree, Pat.
    If total government control equals safety, why are prisons so dangerous?

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  7. #7
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    I want to see details before I'll accept the "grazing" part.

    If both of them were "grazed," I think they're the luckiest kids in the whole world. P <= 0.0001 IMHO.

  8. #8
    if the grazing was enough for both to go to hospital i'm thinking broken glass or fragment splatter

  9. #9
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    I saw the pics on the news this morning, there was a hole punched in the house, one child had a scrape across his chest and the other one had a scrape on his leg. Not minimizing this incident in any way, the wounds were minor but the potential for disaster was so huge it escapes my comprehension.
    It was reported that the woman hunting was maintaining a legal distance from the homes, fired on a deer and "missed wildly".
    If it ain't a rock or pointy stick, it's a copy.

  10. #10
    that makes ya wanna hug your own kid. thats real close especially the one across his chest

  11. #11
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    Rule 4 Violation.

    My blood just boils when people do idiotic things that get kids hurt.
    3KB

    "When confronted by a hungry wolf, it is unwise to goad the beast... But it is equally unwise to imagine the snarling animal a friend and offer your hand..." - Cicero

  12. #12
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    I guess it is possible that the bullet passed through a bunch of trees/woods before hitting the house. Meaning it passed through without hitting anything substantial. It may have just been an unfortunate miss. I know of one case where a man was firing 22 shorts and thought all the trees behind would stop the bullets. Turned out the bullets were traveling quite a distance though no one was hurt.

    I hate to condemn the hunter without more info.
    "No tendency is quite so strong in human nature as the desire to lay down rules of conduct for other people."

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  13. #13
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    But you can't assume that the background behind your target is safe. You must KNOW that what is behind your target WILL, not probably would, but WILL stop the bullet if you miss.
    3KB

    "When confronted by a hungry wolf, it is unwise to goad the beast... But it is equally unwise to imagine the snarling animal a friend and offer your hand..." - Cicero

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    But that's the rub, you actually have NO WAY OF KNOWING if the area beyond you target is safe when you're out deer hunting. All you see in front of you are trees and your bullet can travel over a mile (150 gr. 30-06 @ 2800 fps), just how in the name of heaven can ANYBODY offer an iron clad guarantee his/her bullet will not hit somebody a mile away?
    Charter member PWU (Pud Whackers Unanimous!)

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    OMIGOD!! I see it coming already, some h.a. is going to stand up and declare that he has NEVER missed his target while hunting. Probably the same guy who says he always takes head shots!!
    Charter member PWU (Pud Whackers Unanimous!)

  16. #16
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    That's why heavily-populated, pancake-flat Delaware allows shotguns only -- to restrict projectile travel more in line with the hunter's line of sight.

    If you can't see that you're going to impact the ground (either by shooting at a downward angle or by shooting into the side of a hill), impact a bulletproof backstop, or that the area beyond your shot is completely clear of anything that would be adversely impacted by a bullet do you have any right to be taking that shot?

    You're responsible for the eventual fate of every bullet you fire. There's no "Oops, my bad" option on that issue.
    3KB

    "When confronted by a hungry wolf, it is unwise to goad the beast... But it is equally unwise to imagine the snarling animal a friend and offer your hand..." - Cicero

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    But that's the rub, you actually have NO WAY OF KNOWING if the area beyond you target is safe when you're out deer hunting.
    Always shoot with dirt as a backstop. If that means hunting from a stand so you're shooting down into the ground, then so be it.
    Governments don't live together. People live together.

  18. #18
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    At least the kids were not harmed
    Some day my children will have a lot of guns and that will bring a smile to my face.

  19. #19
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    TallPine wrote:
    Always shoot with dirt as a backstop. If that means hunting from a stand so you're shooting down into the ground, then so be it.
    You mean like from a Tall Pine?

    Lame, I know, but couldn't resist.
    "To my mind, it is wholly irresponsible to go into the world incapable of preventing violence, injury, crime, and death. How feeble is the mindset to accept defenselessness. How unnatural. How cheap. How cowardly. How pathetic." - The Nuge

  20. #20
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    Fella's;

    As has been stated, there is a lot of factual information missing from the incident report as presented here. Keeping that in mind, let's take a good look at what the report says vs a reality check.

    The two kids just happened to be standing, crawling, whatever, so both of them were just touched with the same bullet? Pretty long odds. Much more likely that both were impacted by fragments of the wall the bullet passed through.

    I'm not making light of the incident, but the level of "journalism" here is on the level rumor & gossip. Who determined that the lady was the only hunter in the area? As has been noted, a centerfire rifle bullet can travel quite a ways. So if two people shot at two different deer at nearly the same time, it's possible that one shot was heard, but it wasn't her bullet that did the deed. And then there's the entire matter of bullet recovery & identification.

    Bottom line here is that more facts are needed. As it stands, her defense lawyer has a "gimmie".

    900F
    Birth Certificate? What birth certificate? He don't need no steenkink birth certificate!

  21. #21
    i tried to put myself in the hunters shoes and i would be real shook and feel real lucky at the same time

  22. #22
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    I grew up in northern Michigan, which is wooded just about everywhere. My mom used to make me stay inside for the week of Nov. 15th, for fear of drunk and/or noob hunters.

    "Ay! that deer's wearin' orange, git it!"
    “When you understand the nature of a thing, you know what it is capable of.”
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  23. #23
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    TallPine
    EXACTLY nuff said!

  24. #24
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    Tall Pine,

    You said this:

    Always shoot with dirt as a backstop. If that means hunting from a stand so you're shooting down into the ground, then so be it.
    So it stands to reason, in light of that statement, when a duck or goose hunter shoots a duck it should always be with a dirt backstop, and I guess that means shootingat sitting ducks (what wonderful sport) - or when a squirrel hunter takes a shot it should always be when the squirrel is on the ground or in a tree with a hill towering over the tree and in line of the bullet - or a pheasent hunter should always shoot birds on the ground while the hunter is wearing stilts (no stand hunting would not be practical for them) - or a prairie dog hunter should always shoot from a tripod stand out on the plains - or a deer hunter should always hunt from hilltops or tree stands or with hills directly behind the deer. So be it - you have spoken and all of the hunters for hundreds of years who have done otherwise always have been wrong.

    Why not send that suggestion to the Brady Campaign; I am pretty certain they will consider trying to find someone to pass legislation requiring such. You might send it to PETA too, I am positive they would love such a restriction being placed on hunters. One legislation has been passed, make sure to write your story up for Outdoor Life, Field & Stream, and the American Hunter so all hunters can know that you were responsible for it.

    I guess such a mandate or legislation would also get rid of another 'problem' - that of handicapped hunters who hunt from wheelchairs, old hunters who cannot carry, set-up, or climb a stand, hunters who have a fear of heights, and so forth. Not a bad idea at all, less competition for the rest of us. It would also cut down on usbale hunting land, and hunting spots. Hunter would be required to have that backstop or be in a tree stand thereby making it so that all hunters would either be in a stand or squeezed into places where they had hills available whether or not any game was around.

    Hmm, I just thought of something, you could also spread around that bit of wisdom to law enforcement agencies and departments by way of politicians. Make it so that any time an LEO shoots there has to be a dirt or concrete backstop like a city street. This way LEOs will have to shoot from up above like in helicopters, or from an upper floor's apartment window. Their bullets will not be ale to hurt anyone other than bad guys that way - right!

    There is a way to hunt responsibly, making sure beforehand in which directions it would be safe to shoot even if there is not a 'dirt' backstop. Had the woman in queston followed some common sense approaches to her line of fire, like scouting the area before the hunt, thinking about how far her bullets could travel, using a dirt backstop if feasible, and so forth, well then she would not have had the problem, and no that does not mean she had to be in a tree stand or have a dirt backstop behind her target because sometimes you hunt where such is just not available.

    If any of my above comments seemd harsh, or too sarcastic, then think about the absolute restrictiveness of that word you used referring to when hunters should hunt the way you described. Yeah, its that one above that is in boldface.

    All the best,
    Glenn B
    When I look in the mirror, I am happy to see, some of that nine year old boy, who used to be me!© GRB

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  25. #25
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    If you're going to hunt in a suburban environment then you have to take precautions and know where your bullet is going to land. All the hunters, over hundreds of years, did not have the population density that has to be dealt with today. Safe to shoot is the key. This woman is a poor representative.

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