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Thread: Watched "Shane"Again Last Night For the Umpteenth Time

  1. #1
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    Watched "Shane"Again Last Night For the Umpteenth Time

    I don't know whether Shane is a pro-gun movie or not.It can be viewed on many levels.
    But,viscererally,down deep,to me me this is the ultimate classic American conundrum of gun rights,property rights,anti-gun fears,the children,our future,the American Dream.
    Shane has it all in the personages of Shane,Joe and Marian Starat,Joey,the Rykers,Torrey and the memorable hired gun, Wilson.
    To me,Shane even after 55 years, still reaches somewhere deep down inside of us and makes us realize the Starat's dream is still our dream, and Shane with all his misgiving's, is the man most of us still want to be.
    Who can forget the unforgettable scene when Shane twirls that revolver after dispatching the evil one's?
    Any comments and criticism will be appreciated about my all time favorite 'gun' film.

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    I think they absolutely butchered the book. And I don't care for the way the homesteaders were willing to benefit from Shane's actions while despising him for taking them.

    I also didn't care for the typical Hollywood message that it's ok to crawl until you've had enough then let 'em have it .

    But I loved the cinematography
    It is your dissatisfaction with what IS that is the source of all of your unhappiness. Matthew Scudder

  3. #3
    Taught me not to ask for soda-pop at the saloon

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    You and I are on message Treo.
    And we 2 Shane addict's may be the only poster's on this thread.
    Who care's?Shane is important to us,cinema history and in a certain aspect toward's firearms in general.
    I think I'll watch it again tonight.
    Shane,come back!
    My gosh,George showed up!Thank's George!

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    I find the camera angles amusing at times since the movie makers had to work a bit to disguise Alan Ladd's 5'5" height.

    It's been over 40 years since I've read the book but I still remember the contrast between the apple pie and the tree stump. Interesting what you remember.
    "People demand freedom of speech as a compensation for the freedom of thought which they seldom use."
    - Soren Kierkegaard

    "When morals are sufficient, law is unnecessary; when morals are insufficient, law is unenforceable." - Emile Durkheim

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    It was a fantastic film

    and I think that it is number 1 on someone's list of the 100 greatest western movies. I watch it periodically every 2 years or so. One person above mentioned the cinematography. FYI, it won the Academy Award for that year for Cinematography. Also, I was browsing a book in a book store recently about the guns of the old west and it had a chapter on Hollywood. It told about the SAA that Alan Ladd carried and that it had no front sight and has been lost to wherever....but someone copied it and so the book showed a copy of the nickel-plated SAA with 7 1/2" barrel. Beautiful piece in the movie IMHO. Anyway, as far as it being a gun movie and deeper thinking stuff like that I don't think about that with this particular film. It is a basic, simple story to enjoy for what it is....a fantastic western made in 1953 from an earlier book. A time when you knew exactly who the good was and who the bad guy was and you knew that good was going to overcome evil for a happy ending to the movie or book. Perhaps not exactly realistic, but then do we always need realism for entertainment?

    I am still a fan of westerns and enjoy many of them. I thought the recent new release, named APPALOOSA, was done well. I had already read the book and it was very good also.

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    Read the book it will stay W/ you forever. I think the book was closer to reality in that everybody (except Shane) wore a side arm and it was considered a normal item of dress.

    Also in the book the beating Shane gave Chris was much more severe

    And Shane was more like Val Kilmer's Doc Holliday
    It is your dissatisfaction with what IS that is the source of all of your unhappiness. Matthew Scudder

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    What sticks in my mind was the comments he made to Joey about a gun being just a tool.

    Maybe we ought to pepper YouTube with this scene.

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    What sticks in my mind was the comments he made to Joey about a gun being just a tool.
    Thank you all for the reminiscence.
    Shane is immortal.100 years from now this film will be viewed,reviewed and discussed.It transcends time,boundaries,politics and our very lives.
    I may be wrong, but this will always be the quintessential film of what, in its beautiful simplicity, it really means to be an American.
    "Shane,come back."
    1953.A lifetime ago.But just yesterday.

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    Ok you win I'm watching it again 2nite
    It is your dissatisfaction with what IS that is the source of all of your unhappiness. Matthew Scudder

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    ^Watch for Joey's reaction when he blasts those targets.

    While I liked the film on the face of it when it first came out, one thing that appeals to me about it nowadays, is that it reflects an America of my youth (born 1940), when there was a much more clear line about what was right and what was wrong, with no pussy footin' around, no prevaricatin', no word-weaselin', than today.

    Black was black and white was white, just like their hats.

    There were and always are "grey areas," but the grey area was much smaller back then.

    A simple-minded viewpoint? Perhaps. "Filtered" by the passage of time? Perhaps.

    But that's just me.

    Shane, Shane! Come back, Shane!
    Last edited by 230RN; November 26th, 2008 at 10:32 AM.

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    An excellent movie and some good words of wisdom to live by such as the "gun is a tool" scene. I think it reflects the sheep, sheepdog, wolf scenario we as gun owners all know.
    Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch.
    Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote.

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    Minnesota Carry Permit Instructor

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    1953.A lifetime ago.
    I hope not !

    Don't stick a fork in me I ain't done yet
    Governments don't live together. People live together.

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    Quote:
    1953.A lifetime ago.
    I hope not !

    Don't stick a fork in me I ain't done yet
    Don't worry TallPine.I was speaking in the societal sense, not the time frame of an average human being's life span.
    So relax!You've got miles and miles to go yet in those mountains..And me too on the beach, hopefully.

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    My first post here and its about a subject near and dear to my heart. Love the movie for all the reasons listed above plus;

    Whe viewed in a movie theator it it the only movie I have ever seen that when the charactors shot a gun it sounded like it. Those Colt's going off were loud. That is not so apparant when watching it on the DVD.

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    Welcome, Penny.

    I think of Shane as a pro-gun movie: A gun is a tool. If you're drunk and angry, a gun is not going to help you. Some people are afraid of anyone with a gun. If the bad guys have guns, the good guys are in real trouble if they don't. A gun, without training, is inadequate defense.

    I can agree with all those.

    But Shane is not about guns. It is about redemption.

  17. #17
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    For those interested here is Jack Shaeffer's description of Shane's gun

    There it was the most beautiful looking weapon I ever saw. Beautiful and deadly looking... I knew enough to know that the gun was a single action Colt, the same model as the Regular Army issue...
    This was the same model. But this was no Army gun. It was black , almost blue black, with the darkness not in any enamel but in the metal itself.The grip was clear on the outer curve , shaped to the fingers on the inner curve.and two ivory plates were set into it with exquisite skill, one on each side.... It was clean and polished and oiled...I was surprised to see that the front sight was gone, the barrel smooth right down to the end, and that the hammer had been filed to a sharp point
    It is your dissatisfaction with what IS that is the source of all of your unhappiness. Matthew Scudder

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    It's been so long. I'll have to watch it.

    Woody

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    Thank you,Penny(welcome to THR),Loosedhorse,Treo,and ConstitutionCowboy.
    If everyone in America would take the time to watch Shane,including all our members of Congress and our President Elect and they really reflect on what being an American really means:
    Who knows?
    Perhaps sanity will prevail.
    We can only hope and pray.

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    Welcome, Penny Banks! If I may ask, how'd you find THR.US?

    I was surprised to see that the front sight was gone, the barrel smooth right down to the end, and that the hammer had been filed to a sharp point...
    I've heard of that business of filing down the firing pin (or hammer), but I can't figure out why anyone would do it.

    It would not seem to help ignition. Looks dangerous, too, because of possible pierced primers. Maybe a little narrowing, but still with a round point in order to dent the primer cup a little easier, but not with a sharp point.

    Anyone got an explanation? Or was it just custom, or what?

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    Here it is... "a gun is a tool, ma'am":

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-8X3l...eature=related

    i saw this first in 1953 and I will never forget this scene--or many of the others.

    Of course, that "tool" didn't look like a doggone stapler or glue gun. There will never be anything like a Colt SAA for a story like this.

    Yes, the movie differs from the book, but it is just as good, in my opinion.

    They filmed each scene over an over until it was right. The men fighting and making the trunk wobble...the dog in Grafton's when Shane met Wilson....

  22. #22
    "Was he fast Shane?"

  23. #23
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    "Was he fast Shane?"
    "Yes,he was fast."

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    I've heard of that business of filing down the firing pin (or hammer), but I can't figure out why anyone would do it.
    One of my instructors once mentioned that on his favorite revolver, all the surfaces had been dehorned and smoothed, so he wouldn't cut himself during a fast reload.

    "Except the front sight," he said. "If anyone tries to get the gun away from me by grabbing the barrel, they're going to find out quick I've sharpened the edges. Like a knife."

    I suspect that as Shane was lived in the 5+0 world of the sixgun, the sharpened hammer means he still had a skull crusher if he ran out of ammo, and a deterrent if someone tried a gun-grab from his holster.

  25. #25
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    I don't think Jack Shaeffer had any reall experience W/ firearms. In the climax scene after shooting Fletcher ( Ryker) Shaeffer has Shane break open the cylinder of his SA Colt's to reload it.

    I just watched the movie again and it is a good movie it's just not the book I particularly don't like the way they emasculated Joe Starret.

    The book is very pro RKBA (which is not the same as pro gun) It's also pro " rugged individualism"

    I would really like to see a remake
    It is your dissatisfaction with what IS that is the source of all of your unhappiness. Matthew Scudder

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