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Thread: Exit Wounds

  1. #1
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    Exit Wounds

    Shot a deer today with a .30-06 Spring 180 grain Rem Core-Lokt PSP that created a great exit wound & blood trail. Last year shot one with a .270 Win 130 grain Win Power Point that did not create a blood trail, and I didn't find the deer until about 2 weeks later - too messed up to check for an exit wound.

    In comparison, I'm thinking that the .270 Win 130 grain Win Power Point doesn't typically create an exit wound, hence the lack of a blood trail. Would y'all agree with that statement?
    Deus et Domus
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  2. #2
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    Congrats on the deer.

    Brief answer to your question: Yes.

    However, the best blood trails I've seen have come from non-exiting bullets that center-punched the lungs. The resulting nasal blood spray produced a trail that was wide and intense.

    And short.

    I would consider that bullet energy sufficient to exit the far hide and keep going is wasted, and (for a herd animal) the possibility of wounding the next animal after the bullet passess through the first.

  3. #3
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    Momentum.

    Bigger bullets keep on going, even if they slow down.

    Smaller bullets going faster might have similar energy numbers on a chart, but the velocity burns off fast and you end up with just a small bullet.

    The .270 in question might have as much as 500 fps on the .30-06 when it hit the deer.

    However, momentum matters.
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  4. #4
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    This is an exit wound by a .300 Wea Mag. "Blood trail"?! It was simply red mist.

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    Amen,

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  5. #5
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    This is an excellent example of a bullet using all of it's energy to best advantage. The large hole on the second picture is the entrance wound, only a part on the bullet left the lung cavity.





  6. #6
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    My .270 (150gr Sierra GK BTSP @ 2900 f/sec) made entrance and exit wounds this year..... good blood trail for 100 yards.
    "If it looks like a rabbit, and acts like a rabbit, it will be treated as such- prey for all predators.
    If it looks like a rabbit and bites like a rattlesnake, rabbits will be safer, and predators more reticent."

  7. #7
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    I think it depends on a lot of things. I recently shot a mule deer (100yds, 30-06 180gr BT @ 2750) in the neck and the exit wound was basically the same size as the entrance hole .30". He dropped right where he was, but there was no bloody mess.
    Shot him again in the neck when we got to his bed (he was still breathing) and this time it hit spine and the exit wound was baseball sized. All depends I suppose.
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  8. #8
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    Last year shot one with a .270 Win 130 grain Win Power Point that did not create a blood trail, and I didn't find the deer until about 2 weeks later - too messed up to check for an exit wound.
    Where did the bullet hit him? A .416 Blastamatic-Zowie Magnum won't create a blood trail if the bullet does not expand in tissues that have a lot of blood in them: Shoot a deer in the lungs with an expanding bullet of even .22 caliber (or even a soft lead ball at moderate velocities) and they will die in short order, leaving a trail right to them. You can put a 1 inch hole through their guts and they wont leave much more of a trace than they did before you shot them...... and the easiest way to find them will be to look for buzzards or flocking crows days or even weeks later when peritonitis kills them, probably miles away. Placement, as they say, is everything.
    "If it looks like a rabbit, and acts like a rabbit, it will be treated as such- prey for all predators.
    If it looks like a rabbit and bites like a rattlesnake, rabbits will be safer, and predators more reticent."

  9. #9
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    I shot a deer this year with a Wolf 180 grain soft point 7.62x54r. It made a huge entrance hole and a small exit hole. I somewhat confused by this, until the copper jacket was found inside the deer without any of the lead core. If I had thought that was what actually happened before everything was all cut up, I would have posted pictures.

    BTW, I only had to follow a blood trail for about 2 yards

  10. #10
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    You can't take one instance of no exit wound and then assume the same thin will happen every time you use that bullet. My experiences:

    1. Deer with 222 Remington with 70 gr. Speers - I got an exit wound!!

    2. Deer with a 22-250 at 360 yards with a 70 gr. Speer - complete pass through on the lungs!!

    3. Deer with 150 gr. bullet out of a 308. No exit wound but dead right there.

    4. Deer with a 150 gr. bullet out of a 308. No exit wound but dead right there.

    5. Deer with a 150 gr. bullet (yea, another one). No exit wound but dead right there.

    6. Blue Wildebeest with a 270 gr. Speer from a 375 H&H Magnum. Small entry wound with a tiny drop of blood on the ground (my PH managed to find the drop which I think is a miracle). No exit wound but it ran about 200 yards and died.

    I could go on but I won't (at least not much). I guess from the limited results presented, I could postulate that the very best bullet to use if I wanted an exit would would be a 70 gr. Speer.

  11. #11
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    Isn't placement the key factor. What kind of blood trail or exit wound would you expect from a bullet in a non lethal location. If shot placement is good you won't see much difference between the .270 or 30-06 you described in relation to how far the animal will travel.

  12. #12
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    If shot placement is good you won't see much difference between the .270 or 30-06 you described in relation to how far the animal will travel.
    I believe shot placement was roughly the same - lung shot, as they both covered about the same amount of ground before dying. However, the one shot last year, was found two weeks after the fact, and I couldn't check for entrance wounds. Basically I screwed up on tracking it down, and believe that with a good blood trail that wouldn't of happened - I couldn't find any blood after the shot.
    Deus et Domus
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    "Once abolish the God, and the government becomes the God." -- G.K. Chesterton

  13. #13
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    Personally, I subscribe to the two hole theory. I realize there are good arguments for the one hole theory, but I just prefer them bleeding out of both sides.

    Here's a little buck I got this year:



    .243, 90 grain Speer over 43.3 grains of H414.

    You can see the entry wound, (blood spot on throat above shoulder) bullet left a huge exit hole through the sternum. (I was shooting at about a 40 degree angle from a tree stand and deer was facing me, slightly quartered) Deer ran about 100 yards, but left a very easy (even for me) to follow blood trail the whole way. If the bullet hadn't exited there would have been no blood trail.

    The last deer I killed with a .243 didn't have an exit wound and left no blood trail. He was quartered away from me. Bullet entered through the short ribs, penetrated stomach and one lung and stuck under the hide on the far side. It was a .243 Remington Corelock 100 grain. It was a perfect mushroom and had 67 grains of remaining weight. The deer ran about 1/4 mile and it was pure dumb luck that I found him.
    Pulp

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