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Thread: Can you reload shotgun shells?

  1. #1
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    Can you reload shotgun shells?

    Hey folks, once again I have a question that might seem obvious to you, but is confusing to a newbie like me. Can you reload shotgun shells? I'm not going to try it anytime soon, as I own neither a shotgun (or any gun) or reloading equipment. Thanks!
    I may not agree with what you have to say, but I'll defend to the death your right to say it.
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    yes sir

  3. #3
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    Yes, steps are very much like metallic reloading, equipment is readily available as are components. Quality hulls will survive 4-10 reloadings.

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    Sure you can, as 1911 and jfd have pointed out, if you can afford the shot (the price of shot has gone way up from what it used to cost).

    I inherited a scad of shotshell reloading stuff when my dad died last summer.

    Parker

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    Thanks, I just wasn't sure, because most modern ones have plastic and whatnot. I assume that it would be fairly easy to make your own lead shot, right?
    I may not agree with what you have to say, but I'll defend to the death your right to say it.
    Yes, I am a Pro-Gun Democrat, but with a strong streak of libertarianism.
    Proud native of New Hampshire. Live free or Die!

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    Making your own shot would be a complex and cumbersome process. The manufacturers of shot use different techniques to ensure uniformity and roundness, including dropping it long distances from shot towers.

    Even though the price has gone up from what it cost in the past, it would still be much easier to buy it than to try to manufacture it.
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    Essentially all components for shotshell reloading must be purchased. An exception would be self cast slugs. Quality plastic hulls are in high demand; I waited about 4 months to fill an order of 1000 Federal Gold Medal hulls.

    The variety of stuff going into shells is staggering and nearly infinite versatility is the product. Tailoring the payload to both the gun and the target is something of science, some guesswork and some witchcraft; smart folks stick to published loads but still...

    I got my set-up to load buckshot (requires both a press and some special hand techniques that increase commercial prices to exorbitant--but now I've got 500 rounds "00" sitting on the shelf) and a couple different bird loads. Recently I've cast a few slugs and am experimenting with their performance. Bulk components and bulk shot purchasing holds the price line to a manageable level.

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    The Littleton Shotmaker works - I gather the quality doesn't match bagged but careful sorting gives uniform shot at the cost of time and remelting. Buckshot as round shot can be cast at home as can both punkin ball and Forster and wasp wasted slugs. Historically it hasn't paid except for folks with a business connection to get free lead.

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    You sure can reload them. It's cheap, easy and fun! Do it! All the cool kids are doing it and you want to be cool right!

    Side note: It sure is refreshing to see folks answering this fellows question without snapping "Use the search function!" Well done team. Maybe there's hope for this place yet.
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    Hey folks, once again I have a question that might seem obvious to you, but is confusing to a newbie like me. Can you reload shotgun shells? I'm not going to try it anytime soon, as I own neither a shotgun (or any gun) or reloading equipment. Thanks!
    You can and the first thing to do is buy a book on it and read it before you make any purchases. Link below shows you just a little bit of what is available to you. If you have a skeet or trap range near you you will find a wealth of information from people who do a lot of it and that is always better than just reading the manual and trying it on your own the first time. They will know all the mistakes first timers can and will make because they already have done so and learned better.
    http://www.cabelas.com/shotshell-reloading.shtml
    1934 National Firearms Act, 1968 The Gun Control Act, 1986 Firearms Owners Protection Act, 1993 Brady Handguns Violence Act, 1994 Assault Weapons Ban, 1995 Gun Free School Zones Act, NO MORE COMPROMISING

  11. #11
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    This family of five depends on reloaded shotgun shells.

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    The Lee Load All is a cheap and easy press to start with. I have 5 different 12 gauge presses (Lyman, MEC(2), PW, Lee) and the Load All is my favorite one. It comes with all the bushings for different powder and shot charges.
    Unlike rifle and pistol reloading, shot shell reloading is much more component picky. The hull brand, primer brand, powder, wad, and shot load all are variables in the load. You will need to separate the different brands and styles of hulls.
    With the price of loaded ammo, it can save you a quite a bit of money if you shoot very much.

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    Winchester AA and Remington STS seem the best for reloading, based on their popularity at the Trap shoots I attend. The cheaper hulls like Remington Gun Club, Winchester Super Target, Estate, etc, are more difficult to load and do not last as long.

    Get a decent book on reloading shotshells, a decent tool for doing so,and find someone to show you the basics. Any club with trap, skeet, or sporting clays ranges will likely have some knowledgeable folks who can explain the basics.

    Pay attention to details in the published recipies. Use the components shown for each. Changing any component (primer, powder, wad, hull, etc) can dramatically change pressure. Shotguns are easy to burst of you make a point of ignoring the proper steps and recipie
    Burt Blade

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    Making your own shot would be a complex and cumbersome process.
    Actually it is very easy, I use a Littleton Shot Maker, spits out shot at a very rapid pace. I have no problems keeping my family and a few friends in shot with it. I normally cast shot every couple of years...in a day it is easy to cast 500 pounds.

    http://www.littletonshotmaker.com/

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=szF4zrdD2EY
    But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such government, and to provide new guards for their future security. - The Declaration of Independance

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    ^ That's pretty nifty! I wonder why they use diesel for the coolant, though. Would water just steam up and distort the shot as it hit it? If so, I see that as a major breakthrough... although I personally cannot stand the smell of diesel.

    How about the potential fire hazard? Have you had any problems in that respect?

    walking arsenal remarked:

    Side note: It sure is refreshing to see folks answering this fellows question without snapping "Use the search function!" Well done team. Maybe there's hope for this place yet.
    And yes, I too am pleased at the civil responses to the OP's question. I have been seeing too many sharp corners on a lot of posts on this board of late.

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    Trouble is, these jerkwads can pass dumb, self-serving, agenda-driven stupid laws much faster than we can beat them down in the courts. And they're well aware of that.

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    "...or reloading equipment..." Requires different equipment than rifle/pistol reloading. The presses are usually less expensive though.

  17. #17
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    Thanks for the answers and the advice, you folks are really great.
    I may not agree with what you have to say, but I'll defend to the death your right to say it.
    Yes, I am a Pro-Gun Democrat, but with a strong streak of libertarianism.
    Proud native of New Hampshire. Live free or Die!

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