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Thread: 1911 Magazines with Lanyard loop?

  1. #1
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    1911 Magazines with Lanyard loop?

    I have looked on Midway, Cabela's, and Sportman's guide for the 1911 Magazines with the Lanyard loop.

    Does anyone know where I can order these?
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  2. #2
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    The lanyard loop is on the bottom of the mainspring housing.

    Bumper pads go on the magazine bottom.
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    swgunner, this is the one I am looking for:

    Attachment 89411

    I found this picture on a google picture search but no link to purchase one.
    Last edited by mesinge2; October 31st, 2010 at 11:03 AM.
    "There are three and only three ways to reform our Congressional legislation, familiarly called, the ballot box, the jury box, and the cartridge box".
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    I would try military surplus websites. It looks like something the Cavalry would have used. Other than that I got nothin. But I learned that the critter exists.
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    I am restoring a colt and I really want an this mag for it, but can't find it anywhere.

    Do you know any military surplus sites?
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    Metalform makes them. They have been on sale from time to time at The Sportsmans Guide Company, and I'm not certain but I think Brownells may carry them. Worst case -- call Metalform. They are in Connecticut, I think.

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    The lanyard concept for pistol magazines...

    I could see 1911 series pistol mags having a lanyard for target/field/range use but to put a lanyard/magazine on a military/duty type 1911a1 seems impractical. How would you make a fast re-load or replace the magazine quickly? A backstrap type lanyard hole makes more sense to me.
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    Rusty, I have a book about WW1 and some of the Cav troops have 2 lanyards, one for the mag, one for the gun itself. I never thought about it until this thread. I was thinking it decorative. I guess if you were on horseback and accidently hit the mag release it would be nice to have, other than that I got nothin.

    In the Navy I hated the lanyards on the M9, but people couldn't learn to use the holster properly.
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    Rusty,

    Even though the cavalry carried M1903 Springfields and sabers, their REAL weapon was the M1911 (we are talking about a time BEFORE the M1911A1 which was an INTERWAR development in the 1920s) as that was their highest firepower weapon while they were on horses. The saber could be used from horseback also, but it was not the same. No real way in the world to crank off the M1903 on horseback.

    So, you have the second lanyard on your primary magazine. As you work through your three magazines (mounted cartridge belt had 9 rifle pockets and space to snap on a double M1911 mag pouch) you ALWAYS have one for later, to reload from loose cartridges carried elsewhere, no matter what might have happened with the other two.

    It doesn't make the same amount of sense now, since we are basically not into horse cavalry, but it apparently did to them them. The cavalry is also where the thumb safety and the grip safety came from on the 1911, Browning's previous .45 ACP guns HAD NO SAFETY!

    Just a little something to bring you up on the history involved.

    Buckshot

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    Well, the original design DID have a grip safety, but not a thumb safety.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Rusty Shackleford
    I could see 1911 series pistol mags having a lanyard for target/field/range use but to put a lanyard/magazine on a military/duty type 1911a1 seems impractical. How would you make a fast re-load or replace the magazine quickly? A backstrap type lanyard hole makes more sense to me.
    The original M1911 as adopted by the U.S. Ordnance Department had lanyard loops on the mainspring housing and on the magazines. Rondog's photo of the 1910 prototype also has both lanyard loops. All government-issue M1911s had lanyard loops on the magazines as well as on the pistol until mid-way through WW1, when the loop on the magazines was dropped.

  12. #12
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    I found them!

    Clyinder and Slide still makes them and they are only $29.99.

    Thanks, everyone.
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    Rondog,

    The M1910 is not back far enough.

    There are one or two more back in the series. I think they were even posted here not that long ago.

    One of them is old enough that it basically has TWO links, one in the normal place and one at the muzzle. That had neither the thumb or the grip safety.

    Buckshot

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    That should be the M1905 with the two links.

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    The cavalry is also where the thumb safety and the grip safety came from on the 1911.
    The grip safety predated the thumbsafety by a couple years. The thumb safety was added on request by the U.S. Cavalry so that the mounted trooper could engage a manual safety in order to reholster the pistol and regain control of a frightened horse...not, as many believe...so that the gun could be carried cocked and locked. It was also mandated that the safety lock the slide in place to prevent being pushed out of battery during the reholstering.

    Even then...in the unenlightened age of firearms design...the Army Ordnance Board realized that a soldier under stress may forget to remove his finger from the trigger before jamming the piece into a holster...a point that Gaston Glock apparently failed to consider.

    Browning's previous .45 ACP guns HAD NO SAFETY!
    Sure they did. The half-cock position...and it was still present on the 1911 as adopted by the U.S Army. It was mentioned in the patents dated Februrary 1911. In its original, captive design...it's still with us today.

    To wit:

    "When the hammer is in the firing position, should it become necessary to lower the hammer to the safety position without touching the firing pin..."

    Browning was describing the method of lowering the hammer with one hand to the safety position. Since full down/Condition Two would allow the hammer to rest on the firing pin...that only leaves the half-cock position. So, the half-cock was...by design and intent...an active, manually applied safety in spite of the fact that some people will scream and faint at the mere mention of using it as one. Many of them will do the same thing at the hint of lowering the hammer on a hot chamber...but the gun was designed to do that.
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  16. #16
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    Here is a source for 1911 mags with lanyard loops. I just purchased two mags to go with my new Colt 1918 Black Army Repro!

    http://shop.tsaknives.com/Colt-45-AC...ne-45-293L.htm

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