Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Aluma-hyde II or Gun Kote ?

  1. #1
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    01-01-09
    Location
    the Live Free or Die state
    Posts
    1,350

    Aluma-hyde II or Gun Kote ?

    Looking to refinish two things, a Maverick 88 (learning experience) and a RIA. The Maverick is fairly well worn, so sanding is a must, the RIA has 20 rounds through it, so the parkerizing is intact. I've read good stuff about Aluma Hyde II on parkerized pieces, but the Brownells tech heavily leaned towards Gun Kote. Any actual users of either have an opinion and/or suggestions? The RIA will never see a holster, so holster wear is not of concern.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    03-30-03
    Location
    LA, CA
    Posts
    764
    I've used both and Gunkote is more durable. Use TCE to flood rinse the parkerized surface before applying Gunkote. It becomes an incredibly tough, maintenance free coating.

  3. #3
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    01-22-08
    Location
    Kansas City, MO
    Posts
    2,069
    I've tried a few coatings, and used guncoat exclusively for a while, but the surface prep is key. If the part is not parkerized, it needs 120grit alum oxide blasted. It isn't an option.
    I have switched to Duracoat. I don't use anything else anymore. No heat curing, less dependent on surface prep, and I'm good with an airbrush.
    Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?

  4. #4
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    01-01-09
    Location
    the Live Free or Die state
    Posts
    1,350
    Thanks to both. kcshooter: when you say you tried a few coatings, have you tried the Aluma-hyde II?

    When I Google it, a lot of people say it is good, but when I called Brownells, the tech leaned heavily towards Gunkote, which requires baking. Needless to say, I could buy a small toaster oven for the small parts, but there is no way to bake the Maverick barrel in it and I can forget about baking it in my house oven. That's why I initially went with the Aluma-hyde (no baking) and seems reputable. Now I have three cans of that stuff coming tomorrow and am wondering whether I should return it and buy something else, or whether I should go ahead with it.

  5. #5
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    01-22-08
    Location
    Kansas City, MO
    Posts
    2,069
    I have used alumahyde on a mainspring housing on a 1911 I bobtailed. It goes on a little more like a paint than a coating, but I haven't had any complaints about the part that I did coat with it. That's why I stick with duracoat now, it acts much less like a paint and more like a bonded epoxy coating.
    Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?

  6. #6
    New Member  
    Join Date
    10-03-07
    Location
    SE North Dakota
    Posts
    14
    I coated the receiver, trigger guard AND barrel of a Franchi 48AL 12 gauge shotgun with Allumahyde II. It should not be confused with paint, although it sprays on and doesn't require baking. It is an epoxy coating that is extremely durable. The shotgun is showing no wear at all. Prep is the key. The downside is that it took over a week to completely cure/dry! I followed instructions, but may have applied too many coats. I would use it again without hesitation.

  7. #7
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    01-01-09
    Location
    the Live Free or Die state
    Posts
    1,350
    Agreed! A few months ago I refinished Maverick 12ga in it, as posted on another thread. It's holding up much better than bluing (at least the stock bluing). Since then I refinished my Rem 700 in .204 Ruger, just to give it some extra protection on top of the parkerizing. The only prep was brake cleaner, several times over, masking, and spray. Did about 8 thin coats, let cure for a week outside under a carport roof, and put all back together. Once it cures, it is amazingly tough, not at all like a paint. I was concerned with the barrel heat ad the epoxy peeling, but after 60 rounds fairly fast, the epoxy actually seems harder and tougher.

  8. #8
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    05-03-03
    Location
    HSV, AL.
    Posts
    271
    Aluma Hyde II is durable once cured - you can accelerate hardening with moderate heat 120 or so. It is cheaper - I would not hesitate to use it on the Maverick but would not on the RIA -

    I hit Ak's with Aluma Hyde and it looks fine and more like the original paint. I did a CZ 75 that was in a bad way it looked ok but too shiny for my taste. It looks pretty good on Enfields too.

    I like Gunkote on pistols and more important long guns.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •