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Thread: Gun safe questions for all of you...(Humidity Control).........

  1. #1
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    Smile Gun safe questions for all of you...(Humidity Control).........

    I am very interested in if any of you monitor your humidity levels in your gun safe and what is the best range to try to keep it at?

    I know most people just say put in some desiccant bags and be done with it.

    I not only want to protect the metal parts but I also want to protect my wood stocks that are in there! Don't want them to dry out and crack!

    I do not have the option of putting in an electrical powered device without comprising the fire and water proof ratings and protection of my safe. I need to control it without power from the outside.

    I know there are some battery operated units out there, what has been good and what has been not so good?

    Any good suggestions on what to use and to what would be the proper humidity levels that I should keep in the safe?


    Thanks ahead of time!


    GRP
    ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ!

  2. #2
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    I don't monitor the humidity of my safe. I monitor the humidity of my house. At least I did in the last two houses I lived in, houses that had moisture problems. The humidity meter helped me know when to run the dehumidifier before the odor told me. If your humidity is well controlled, as in the more modern house I now live in, you don't need a humidity meter or dehumidifier. If your house humidity is well controlled you need to either lower the humidity of air inside your safe to prevent condensation by either reducing the moisture content or raising the temperature. I do the temperature control with a heater I built myself, 25 watts. I bought one of those goldenrod things but it was not powerful enough to make a noticeable difference so I sent it back. My house is typically 55 to 60 percent humid, I'm guessing the heater lowers the humidity of the safe interior by 10 percent. Remember the definition of humidity, the ratio of how much water is in the air divided by how much water the air can hold at saturation. The denominator, the amount of water the air can hold at saturation can be changed by raising the temperature.

  3. #3
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    Remember the definition of humidity, the ratio of how much water is in the air divided by how much water the air can hold at saturation. The denominator, the amount of water the air can hold at saturation can be changed by raising the temperature.
    Correct. That is the definition of relative humidity, which is what a standard humidity monitor measures.

    Mine (in the safe) varies from 40% or less in the winter to 60% in the summer. Never had a rust or moisture issue.
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  4. #4
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    "I know most people just say put in some desiccant bags and be done with it."

    Most people I know use a GoldenRod. That's all I've needed for 20+ years. Plug it in and forget it. The dessicant was a complete waste of time, even when used with the GoldenRod. I have a digital humidity gauge from Radio Shack, but haven't needed it since I tossed the big containers of dessicant.

    Drilling a hole in the safe is no big deal. Run the wire through and buy a tube of fire-proof sealant at the hardware store. Cover that with silicone caulk if you must. Also cover the holes in the safe bottom where the bolts come through. You wouldn't want water seeping up.

    JT

  5. #5
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    Gee, I've had excellent results with desiccant bags. My safes are in my "gun room," in the house with heat pump climate control. Granted, I have a very large supply of them, but I live in NW Oregon, very near the Columbia River and it has been known to be damp here.

    That's my experience. Your mileage may vary.
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  6. #6
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    It is the Goldenrod for me. Been using them for 40 years with no rust on my guns.

  7. #7
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    I have 3 safes in a closet out in the garage. 2 more in a closet in the house. 'I just use these humidity gauges and have found them to be very accurate.
    In the closet in the house I have a small dehumidifier that runs in the closet year round. In the garage closets I have of rice tied in socks and thrown in there.
    The house climate controlled environment stays around 55%-60% year round....
    The outside safes stay 40%-60% year round.
    I keep my black rifles outside and the wood stocked rifles inside.
    Years have passed and I have never had a speck of rust nor any wood cracking....
    Yes I know....rice in a big sock tied at the end....but hey it works!

  8. #8
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    Golden Rod's function is to raise the interior temperature just ever so slightly more than ambient to prevent condensation. So it doesn't remove moisture, just keeps the items inside a little warmer so it doesn't collect on the surface. I use both a goldenrod and a small tub of water absorbent I replace regularly.

  9. #9
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    I have used a Goldenrod for about 24 years with no rust at all.

    Mike D.

  10. #10
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    I live on a boat- it's well air-conditioned, and pretty dry as far as boats go, but it's still a boat.

    Goldenrods are best, but most of my storage is portable, so I use the Pelican Brand Silica Packs ( http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...ef=oss_product ), and at US$5.00 each, they workpretty good- I throw them all in the oven about every 4-6 weeks to recharge, and they keep everything nice and dry.

    Of course, the containers they are in are gasketed and pretty well-sealed.
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  11. #11
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