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Thread: Help with my Lyman .36 New Model Navy

  1. #1
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    Help with my Lyman .36 New Model Navy

    Hello! I've got what I believe to be a New Model Navy .36 cal. revolver by Lyman. The hand on the hammer broke some time ago and I can't seem to get a straight answer out of parts suppliers as to what parts I need for my revolver. It says it's made in Italy so I'm guessing it's Pietta but I would like some assurance and it would be great to be recommended a reliable site to purchase the right parts.

    "~Lyman Middlefield Conn.~" is engraved on the top of the barrel as well as ".36 cal. New Navy" on the left side of the barrel (as if you were holding the gun to fire) AND "For Blackpowder Only- Made in Italy" is on the right side of the barrel. like I said, I would be grateful if anyone could give me an idea or tell me exactly what company manufactured the parts for this revolver and where I may find them. Thank you for all replies.

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    Several people have said several different things on the boards. Most say it was made either by Armi San Paolo (now Euro Arms) or Uberti. Some say Pietta.

    If you look closely, there may be some proof marks on it somewhere that could be used to identify the maker.

    Have you contacted Lyman? Surely they would know.

    Did the hand itself break, or just the spring?

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    The hand broke along with the spring. It was badly rusted. One of the trigger springs broke as well. And I will contact Lyman! I actually didn't think about that hehe. thank you.

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    Look on the frame or under the rammer on the barrel for manufacturer's symbols. Proof markings will also be on the frame and possibly the cylinder. DGG in a circle=old euroarms (Armi San Poalo?), ASM or SM is Armi San Marco, an octagon with a "U"inside it is Uberti, FAP inside a triangle is Pietta. That's all I can think of off the top of my head. Usually there is either the symbol or the name written out. A small rectangle with letters or numbers/roman numerals is a year of manufacture code on the frame.

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    Okay as far as symbols go, they are a bit worn but here is what I've come up with.

    on right side of barrel right before the engraved "for black powder use only-Made in italy" there are two symbols. the first one is what looks to be a coat of arms with a star in a circle above it, the second one (right next to it) is a "PN" with a star in a circle above it. these are small as you can imagine but that is an accurate description.

    On the right side of the frame below the cylinder, right above the trigger area, are three symbols. From left to right: The coat of arms I mentioned before; The next one is very worn, the entire left side of the symbol seems to have worn off from sitting in a holster BUT I can make out an "AC" that is in a rectangle; and the third one is the "PN" with the star in a circle above it.

    On the bottom of the frame, as in the bottom of the handle, there is a serial number....but it has been scratched out by whomever owned the gun before me. So, those are all the symbols I see, the only other place I found them is on the cylinder but it's a repetition of the symbols elsewhere. Anyone have any clues to those? thank you for the help!

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    This may help, as there are some photos of various manufacturer's marks:

    http://www.powderhombre.com/mbpproofmarks.pdf

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    Thank you Dutch3, that was helpful. I know that the gun was made in 1977 now. I got to looking, and right under the barrel above the rammer, is the markings for Armi San Paolo. thanks to all for the help!

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    But again, can anyone point me to a site where I can buy replacement parts for this gun? I'm looking as of the moment, but I'm finding it hard to find Euroarms parts. It's the .36 cal.1858 New Model Navy by Remington model.

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    Good job, Dutch.
    Gyortren, Look under the barrel right where it screws into the frame under the rammer. I've seen mfr marks there. What you are seeing so far are the provisional and final proof marks of Italy and the manufacture year of 1977.

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    http://www.ssfirearms.com/

    These guys carry euroarms parts. You can download a PDF of their replacement parts. I have bought from them for my two Remington Navies (one actually says Lyman on the barrel but both are Euroarms with the mfg mark under the barrel.

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    Okay I think I'm good to go. thank you Hellgate! I'll give them a call tomorrow and get some parts. Once again, thanks to everyone for a big help!

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    Good deal, Gyortren!

    I hope you can locate the parts you need.

    -D

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    I had a similar problem

    I had the main spring break in an 1861 Colt and an 1858 Remmy by Pietta. Cabelas does make rebuild kits that have the springs and various parts. I could not find them in stock at that time. I took my gun apart and found thin spring metal and manufactured my own hand spring, and here is the funny part: the wife had a set of chinese steak knives in a cutlery set. I took two of the blades and it took some time but I cut them off at the handle and drilled through both, then reshaped the ends so they touched under the hammer and propelled if forward. Those knives were icredibly tough and seven years later the gun is still firing with these modifications. I would try Cabela's first and look into rebuild kits.

    Of course redoing steak knives is not for everyone. It took a long time, but those things will never rust. It also helps to shoot peroxide all through the mechanism and blast it with carb cleaner because the pressure blows are the crap out of the gun and leaves it very clean. You never see a china man witha rusty knife.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Genefog View Post
    I took my gun apart and found thin spring metal and manufactured my own hand spring, and here is the funny part: the wife had a set of chinese steak knives in a cutlery set. I took two of the blades and it took some time but I cut them off at the handle and drilled through both, then reshaped the ends so they touched under the hammer and propelled if forward.

    Be very glad you have a far more understanding and patient wife than my husband does. A hacksaw blade would be better for the task as it would be more 'springie' and you wouldn't have to worry what the better half might decide to cut with what is left of the set.

    Ultimate OMB reward

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    Spring

    Oh it was notbig deal, it was a set she had no concern over since she got it for free and didn't know what to do with the extras. I'm sure a hacksaw blade would work well also. Those steak knives are still holding up.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Genefog View Post
    Oh it was notbig deal, it was a set she had no concern over since she got it for free and didn't know what to do with the extras. I'm sure a hacksaw blade would work well also. Those steak knives are still holding up.

    Never assume, remember the old saying- one man's assumption is some woman's grounds for divorce!

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    :)

    Quote Originally Posted by Selena View Post
    Never assume, remember the old saying- one man's assumption is some woman's grounds for divorce!
    She knows better than to divorce me, I passed an audition yesterday.

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    .....

    Quote Originally Posted by Selena View Post
    Never assume, remember the old saying- one man's assumption is some woman's grounds for divorce!
    Well at this point, with all the hell she spent 18 years putting me through, she'd have been divorced at least ten years ago if finances would have allowed. At least my guns are reliable and do what they need to do.

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