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Thread: BOR for Kids

  1. #1
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    BOR for Kids

    I was curious how the Bill of Rights is being presented to kids in school in the wake of McDonald and Heller. I can remember some texts from a decade or two ago (when listing the BOR in an appendix) either explaining that 2A was a collective right of militias, or simply leaving it out altogether!

    However, there appears to be some hope:

    http://www.historyforkids.org/learn/...llofrights.htm: "2. Congress can't stop people from having and carrying weapons, because we need to be able to defend ourselves."

    http://www.buzzle.com/articles/bill-...-for-kids.html: "Amendment II: The second amendment says that Congress cannot stop or restrict people from having and carrying weapons for their safety or in situations where they need to defend themselves."

    But, it's not all positive. The Scholastic News still instructs teachers to describe the Consitituion as a "Living Document," and to ask, "How does the right to bear arms apply to today's society?" Well code-worded, but still says, "Insert anti-gun-rights message here."

    My kid's school district points to an on-line Constitution resource, Interactive Constituiton. Disappointingly, they have never even heard of Heller:
    Some legal scholars interpret the first clause of the Second Amendment as giving the people the right to bear arms only as part of a “well regulated militia.” To these scholars, such a militia would be today’s National Guard, which is the modern-day successor to the minutemen of the colonial period. Other scholars emphasize that a militia, at the time of the adoption of the Bill of Rights, consisted of “the body of the people”...
    Perhaps you will join me in investigating what your kids are being asked to use as educational resources, and then asking any providers who seem out of step with Heller to get with it!

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    Good thread topic, LH.

    Texas and North Carolina recently had contentious debate about the selection of textbooks/curriculum for the teaching of American history in public schools. Not only the 'what' (should the focus be on founding fathers and the Constitution, or Vietnam-era protests and the CRA) but the 'when', i.e., those in favor of modern, progressive, history wanted such complex subjects reserved for highschool students, while opining, ironically, that students should learn about the "more easily comprehensible 'founding documents'" while in elementary school.

    (btw, if/when I have kids, I'd want them home-schooled.)

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    My poor child gets 'lessons' from my Dad on the subject. Starting with Rousseau and the various documents that inspired the principles of the Constitution. I pity the teacher that tries to give her the 'modern' view of limited government.

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    i send my kid to a private school.

    it costs more than i can really afford, but your time and a good education are the best things you can give your kids.

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    While its always fun to discuss what comparative education pubbies, preppies or home-growns get, what I'm really looking for is resources. If Uncle Bob or Mr. Thompson says X about the Bill of Rights, that's fine for a while. But eventually, the student is going to want (and need) to "reality test" and fact-check beyond the authority immediately in front of them.

    If we happen to discover that the resources used by public schools vary in quality or bias compared to resources used in private settings, that would be interesting.
    Last edited by Loosedhorse; February 19th, 2011 at 03:13 PM. Reason: typos

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    If we happen to discover that the resources used by public schools vary in quality or bias compared to resurces used in private settings, that would be interesting.
    thats the case in my area.

    publik skoos use the standard liberal interpretation medias.....prime example of the civil war since im in the deep south.

    publik skoos says it was over slavery (abolished in 1863), which wasnt banned until the civil war (started in 1861) was two years old and even then the last state to abolish it in writing was a northern state (1865).

    however, in a private school setting theyre also taught about the sale of cotton to france (by the south) because of the better price offered by france than the north, that the north of course didnt like because they wanted it at a cut rate, hence the harbor blockade by northern ships in Charleston S.C. (because the south was setting up its own foriegn trade aggreements, because each state had the right to govern themselves on such things per the Constitution), harbor where the first shot of the civil war occured (1861).

    the list is lengthy.....anti gun rights laws were designed to keep free black slaves (even after all blacks were freed) from owning or carrying guns without authority of local law enforcement, who of course gave permission to whites to carry guns, but never blacks. but publik skoos wont tell that side of the gun control debate.

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    But eventually, the student is going to want (and need) to "reality test" and fact-check beyond the authority immediately in front of them.
    My material while home-schooled on the Constitution and BOR were the commentaries written in the same era. My friend, that attended a public school had cut and dried interpretations of contemptory (misspelling intentional) 'scholars.' The modern definition of interstate trade and 18th century definition are quite different.

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    thats the case in my area.
    I believe it. Do you have any specifics about the texts or on-line resources used by public schools being anti- or pre-Heller oriented regarding 2A, while a private school is using more accepting and up-to-date approach? Interested in other BOR amendments, too, though no others have had such seminal cases lately--even rejection of McCain-Feingold didn't "define" the right of free speech in the way that rejection of the "collective right" theory has defined 2A.
    The modern definition of interstate trade and 18th century definition are quite different.
    Part of that's inevitable, as some features of interstate trade today were unimagined in the 1700s. Some later-than-18th C. resources are probably needed to discuss how interstate commerce powers apply to the internet (for example), although contemporary sources are of course great for giving us a feel of what powers were not felt to have been granted to the government by that clause.

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    I believe it. Do you have any specifics about the texts or on-line resources used by public schools being anti- or pre-Heller oriented regarding 2A,
    no i don't. i have no idea what material they are using in the publik skoos in my area....but comparative test scores for each grade show that they are way behind the school my child attends...that and the blank stare many of the publik skoo kids have on their face when my child speaks with them about things that are not on the Disney or Nickalodian chanels.

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