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Thread: What .223 loads to try in a Rem 700?

  1. #1

    What .223 loads to try in a Rem 700?

    Just got a Remington 700. Haven't shot it yet, but I intend to feed it mostly hand loads.

    My first batch will be what I have on hand:
    - reloaded 55gr Hornady BTFMJs over H-Varget
    - PMC 55gr
    - PMC 62gr

    Once I have those as a baseline and some fireformed brass I think I want to play with:
    - The same 55gr load adjusting the powder charge up or down and watching the groups
    - The same 55gr load adjusting the resizing to get a feel for what fireformed brass can do for me/the rifle
    - Different bullet weights. The barrel is 1:12 twist and should be able to drive heavy bullets.

    Any other ideas for what to tinker with? Any warnings or suggestions about my plans above?

  2. #2
    Just re-read parts of the ABCs of Reloading and damned if I didn't get my twist rates backwards. The Remington is 1 in 12", which is better for lighter bullets.

    Glad I caught that before I burned money on some 75 grain loads.

  3. #3
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    I've had trouble finding a bad load with Varget for .222 or .223.

    For the heavier bullets try to find short ones. Flat base spire points. You never know till you try.

    jim
    Commom sense isn't very common anymore.

  4. #4
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    One of my favorite projectiles is a 52 gr Sierra match grade boat tail hollow point. They perform fantastic through bolt guns with a ROT of 1:10-1:12. My Howa puts out some very tight groups with these. I have a whole list of other stuff it likes as well.

    Play with some different powders. This is as important as projectiles. You may think your gun doesnt like a certain bullet , but , it could just as easily be the powder the gun doesnt like.

    What length is the barrel 24" or 26". Use the slower of the powders as far as the burn rate is concerned.


    Also watch out for military cases. The webbing is a little thicker and doesnt have room for the same volume as standard brass. Usually if you look close enough most load data will specify to decrease your powder charge by 10% when loading mil surp. If you dont head the warning and crank it up to max charge you could end up with a compressed load. This could hurt you or tear your gun up.
    Brandon

    Take a kid shooting. They are the future.

  5. #5
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    For the heavier bullets try to find short ones. Flat base spire points. You never know till you try.
    This is some very good advice. W/o getting into a long drawn out discussion about bullet shapes and profiles I will add this. Usually what makes the difference between ROT's and bullet weight actually comes down to the length of the bullet not so much the weight. Faster twists like a longer bullet to stabilize . Slower twists like a shorter bullet. So if you want to shoot heavier bullets in a slower twist look for a shorter bullet. Typically heavier bullets are longer. Simply b/c they are all .224 dia. so when adding extra material is has to go somewhere which is usually the length.
    Brandon

    Take a kid shooting. They are the future.

  6. #6
    W/o getting into a long drawn out discussion about bullet shapes and profiles
    You say that like its a bad thing.

  7. #7
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    First thing I would do is buy some BETTER bullets. Sierra MK or Hornady A-max are good, the 52-55 grain weight range is where you need to be, at least to start.
    It is hard to do much accuracy load development with a blunt instrument like a FMJ.
    I have a few facts and a lot of opinions.

  8. #8
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    Besides the match bullets, I've had great luck with 50 or 55 grain V-Max or Ballistic Tips. With any reasonable powder they shoot great.

  9. #9
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    I had a Remington 700 in 6MM remington
    It had a beautiful stock & finish
    It was super accurate
    It was one of the guns with the bad safety---I sold it to a gunsmith.
    I wish I had the gun repaired & kept it---I miss it every trip to the range
    Have fun with your 700---they are a great rifle
    H

  10. #10
    I looked up a Remington 700 VTR that has a 1 in 9 twist.
    The Remington 700 Varmint SF has a 1 in 12 twist.

    You state yours is a 1 in 12 twist.

    My cousin has a Browing A-Bolt .223 with 1 in 12 twist. He says it will not stabilize the Federal Gold Match 69 grain BTHP. He bought a case not thinking about the twist rate. 1 in 9 would be better for the job of heavier bullets I think.

    So, don't buy a bunch of the heavier .223 rounds until you know. Ammo is expensive.

  11. #11
    http://www.remington.com/products/fi...l-700-bdl.aspx

    Says the BDL in .223 is 1:12" .

    How can I measure twist rate? More importantly, does it even matter? The desired outcome is "my gun shoots well with X,Y,Z bullet weights" so I can just experiment and find out.

  12. #12
    If yours is the BDL then it must be 1 in 12.

    How to measure twist rate... I have an idea, but first let me do a search.
    Hmm, my idea seems to be in accordance to internet wisdom/myth.

    Put a patch on your cleaning rod so that it is a tight fit. Push it partly into the barrel, 15 inches should be good, more if you like. Put a mark on your cleaning rod (use maybe a lead pencil). Mark the rod in two ways. One mark a horizontal line even with the end of the barrel. Another mark, a notch running length wise to the rod, put it at top or 12 o'clock. Pull the rod out watching for the mark to come back around and be on top. Mark at the end of the barrel and measure the distance. I think that might work. Not sure.

  13. #13
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    It works.
    I use a swivel handle cleaning rod with a little masking tape flag that is easy to watch make one revolution. A felt tip pen to make a mark in line with some feature on the action at the start and end of that revolution will tell you the twist rate.
    I have a few facts and a lot of opinions.

  14. #14
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    I have a Savage 12FV 223 heavy barrel with a 6-24 scope with accu-trigger
    It shoots good with Hornady A-Max 52 grbt with 24 gr H335
    Also: Hornady V-Max 55 gr with 22 gr H322
    Have fun,=====
    H

  15. #15
    try loding 4198 powder

  16. #16
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    Excellent rifle

    I have a Rem 700 in LH in .223. Once I got it dialed in, it shoots sub MOA reliably.

    My best results came from Hornady 52 gr. BTHP match bullets ahead of WW748. Proper case prep also made a difference (size, trim, chamfer & debur). I added a Lee Precision FCD (factory crimp die) as well.

    It's a pleasure to shoot - all afternoon sometimes!
    "Liberalism is a philosophy of consolation for Western Civilization as it commits suicide."

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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by HOWARD J View Post
    I have a Savage 12FV 223 heavy barrel with a 6-24 scope with accu-trigger
    It shoots good with Hornady A-Max 52 grbt with 24 gr H335
    Also: Hornady V-Max 55 gr with 22 gr H322
    Have fun,=====
    H
    Sweet gun Howard. I have a 112 vfss in 22-250 with the accutrigger. I like it a lot. It's a fine piece of hardware.
    Brandon

    Take a kid shooting. They are the future.

  18. #18
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    Savage .223

    Quote Originally Posted by bruno2 View Post
    Sweet gun Howard. I have a 112 vfss in 22-250 with the accutrigger. I like it a lot. It's a fine piece of hardware.
    My Savage model 12 is a great shooter. Have shot in the .1s with it. I like to experiment with different powders and bullets. It shoots the 52 amax and SMKs with a full load of H335, 26.5 gr., very well. I just loaded up 3 small batches of different OALs. 2.25, 2.275, and 2.30. When the weather clears up I'll find out what OAL works best, then try different weights and maybe powders.
    Bob

  19. #19
    Not a really experienced 223 shooter here, but as I understand it 1 in 9" or 1 in 7" is a faster spin than a 1 in 12"...
    AND
    heavier projectiles want faster spin rates to stabilize.

    So a 40 grain varmint pill will stabilize mo betta than a 63 grain penetrator bullet in a 1:12 barrel.

    The OP's 1:12 barrel should be a sweet shooter., all other things being equal.

    Unless i am Wrong.
    Last edited by markshere2; February 16th, 2013 at 01:36 AM.

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