Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: What's the most accurate load for your '58 Remington?

  1. #1
    Moderator  
    Join Date
    05-30-06
    Location
    North Idaho/Eastern Washington
    Posts
    1,375

    What's the most accurate load for your '58 Remington?

    I recently read where a guy used 25 grains of 777, some filler, and a .454" round ball to get 3" groups at 25 yards with a Pietta '58 New Model Army. Not bad-- a little better than what I've gotten. I've also read that 777 gives very inconsistent velocity in a pistol with such light charges, though I've never tried it.

    What's your best load for accuracy? Powder, wad or filler if used, projectile, over the ball grease if used.

  2. #2
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    09-30-03
    Location
    SW PA
    Posts
    1,808
    I just picked up a pair of New Model Army's from Cabelas (on sale $179.99) and will be shooting them shortly. Seem pretty nicely made. Only a few burrs and sharp edges to address. I've got .454 and .451's to try. Will report back when I get to make smoke.

  3. #3
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    02-17-04
    Location
    Remote Utah desert
    Posts
    237
    Uberti 1858 Remington, .44 caliber:

    Goex FFFG 26.4 grains from flask spout (average)
    Lee 200 gr. conical, cast of soft lead
    Lubricated with Gatofeo No. 1 lube
    Remington No. 11 cap, pinched
    No wad beneath bullet
    20 yards from benchrest
    Group About 1X1 inch, some groups went 1.5 X 1.5 inch. I attribute this to my 56-year-old eyes getting weak.
    All shots in black, about 1 inch to the right of point of aim
    Most accurate conical bullet I've used, but .454 or .457 balls are easier to obtain and can be equally or more accurate.
    "And therein did I see an ugly cat. Blue smoke. Brimstone. Holes in paper. And this ugly cat was much amused." --- the prophesies of Gatodamus (1503 - 1566).

  4. #4
    Moderator  
    Join Date
    05-30-06
    Location
    North Idaho/Eastern Washington
    Posts
    1,375
    Gato, that's much better than I'm getting at 25 yd with my Pietta and 29 gr FFF. I use the Lee 200 also, and round ball. Those are what, 5-shot groups?

  5. #5
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    10-31-04
    Location
    Sarasota Fla / Huntersville N.C.
    Posts
    2,190
    35 gr of Pyrodex "P"
    .457 round ball
    Wonder Wad.

    I'll shoot in the 10 ring off a bench all day at 25 yards.

    AFS
    'Qui tacet consentit': To remain silent is to consent.

  6. #6
    Moderator  
    Join Date
    05-30-06
    Location
    North Idaho/Eastern Washington
    Posts
    1,375
    AFS; is yours a Pietta, Uberti, or what?

  7. #7
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    10-31-04
    Location
    Sarasota Fla / Huntersville N.C.
    Posts
    2,190
    Sorry , Pietta.

    AFS
    'Qui tacet consentit': To remain silent is to consent.

  8. #8
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    10-31-04
    Location
    Sarasota Fla / Huntersville N.C.
    Posts
    2,190
    Sorry. Pietta.
    OP asked for load not specfic weapon

    AFS
    'Qui tacet consentit': To remain silent is to consent.

  9. #9
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    02-17-04
    Location
    Remote Utah desert
    Posts
    237
    The load I posted above is with six Lee conical bullets, not five. At the range, I always load six because I shoot right away.
    If I were to carry it in a holster, I'd leave one chamber empty and put the hammer down on that.
    I don't shoot at an organized range. I live in the remote Utah desert and just set up my table, pistol rest and boxful of accessories any safe place I choose. The distant mountains are my backstop.
    Since shooting those groups at 20 yards, I've gone over to the standard 25 yards. At that distance, my Uberti-made 1858 will put six conicals into 1-1/2 to 2" groups -- that's bullet holes measured center to center.
    My eyes ain't what they used to be ...
    "And therein did I see an ugly cat. Blue smoke. Brimstone. Holes in paper. And this ugly cat was much amused." --- the prophesies of Gatodamus (1503 - 1566).

  10. #10
    Moderator  
    Join Date
    05-30-06
    Location
    North Idaho/Eastern Washington
    Posts
    1,375
    Gato; That is excellent! Is that a stock Uberti or have you done things to it?

  11. #11
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    02-17-04
    Location
    Remote Utah desert
    Posts
    237
    It's stock. Never been touched by a gunsmith.
    When I first got it, I smoothed the bore with tight patches containing Iosso Bore Cleaner.
    I also took Swiss Needle Files to the inner frame and edges of moving parts to remove tiny burrs. However, I didn't touch any of the mating surfaces on the bolt, hand, trigger, hammer or cylinder ratchets. Those surfaces should only be touched by a gunsmith familiar with them.
    All I did was remove tiny burrs from their edges, with a very light pass. This smoothed the action considerably.
    That Uberti Remington .44 remains one of my most accurate handguns. I shoot it and my Kimber Custom Classic Target .45 ACP about equally. Both are probably capable of even greater accuracy, but my eyes are not.
    "And therein did I see an ugly cat. Blue smoke. Brimstone. Holes in paper. And this ugly cat was much amused." --- the prophesies of Gatodamus (1503 - 1566).

  12. #12
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    02-17-04
    Location
    Remote Utah desert
    Posts
    237
    I should add ... the Uberti-made cap and ball revolvers have deeper rifling than other makes. I suspect this shrugs off the accuracy-robbing effects of fouling much better, and the taller lands dig deeper into the projectile to spin it with greater stability.
    I have an Uberti-made Remington .36 with modern, adjustable Patridge sights, made in 1973. Alas, this revolver has some of the shallowest rifling I've ever seen in a cap and ball revolver, and is disappointing at the range: 4 or 5-inch groups at 25 yards from a benchrest.
    I've tried a variety of loads with .380 balls and the Lee conical bullet. The above is typical. A harder alloy might grab the rifling better and increase accuracy, though. I haven't tried this, and am reluctant to, because hard alloys when used with black powder (and its substitutes) usually create severe leading. It also strains the loading lever to press hard projectiles down into the chamber (I don't own a table-mounted rammer, but perhaps this is a good reason to purchase one).
    The later gun writer Elmer Keith wrote that the Colt and Smith & Wesson Model 1917 revolvers, adopted by the military in World War I and chambered for the .45 ACP cartridge, were good, accurate guns with copper-jacketed G.I. ammo.
    But when used with lead bullets, accuracy suffered unless you used a bullet around the hardness of Linotype, which is a very hard lead alloy (Brinnell Hardness Number of 22; pure lead has a hardness of BHN 4).
    The softer lead bullets slipped in the shallow rifling and weren't getting a good spin by the rifling.
    This is undoubtedly what's happening with my old Uberti. I'm uncertain when Uberti changed to deeper rifling, but it must have been long ago. All I've ever seen had good, deep lands.
    "And therein did I see an ugly cat. Blue smoke. Brimstone. Holes in paper. And this ugly cat was much amused." --- the prophesies of Gatodamus (1503 - 1566).

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •