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Thread: Head space

  1. #1
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    Head space

    Any one know what the head space is on a 1851 colt revolver .36 cal

  2. #2
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    Head space

    Anyone know what the head space is on a 1851 colt navy 36 cal

  3. #3
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    Is the concept of head space even applicable to a black powder firearm that does not use cartridges? Did you mean "correct cylinder gap" or something else? Could you expand on the question please?
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    To my knowledge, head space is meaningless in a cap and ball revolver. Cylinder gap, on the other hand, is an issue. Run a search on that and you will get many hits. Sorting wheat from chaff is left as an exercise for the student.

    For future reference, posting identical threads in two sub forums is frowned upon.

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    http://www.theopenrange.net/forum/in...ic=3447.0;wap2
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    Merged Threads

    FYI, I moved the duplicate thread from General over here to the tech forum.
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  6. #6
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    The term headspace is not applicable to cap and ball revolvers or muzzleloaders in general.

  7. #7
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    The term headspace is not applicable to cap and ball revolvers...
    Technically true, since there is no case "head". I've used the term "headspace" to describe the position of the end of the cone in relation to the hammer nose when the hammer is down. In that case, the "headspace" should be zero or maybe a thou or so, when the cylinder is all the way forward.

    I have a Uberti remington that, if the cylinder is pushed forward, will still have some cylinder gap (the cylinder hits the frame around the cylinder pin [arbor] before it hits the barrel). The amount of front-to-back travel is therefore not the same thing as "cylinder gap". That travel could be called "headspace" but again there is no "head" involved with these guns.

    In my Pietta Colt, the cylinder gap is the same as the front-to back travel of the cylinder, i.e. the cylinder's forward travel is stopped by the barrel. Same with my Pietta Remington. In both cases it's about 5 thou, and I think that is about the right gap (just in case the OP was serious).

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  8. #8
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    Agreed with a few others. There is no headspace in a muzzleloader. Headspace is the distance between the data point of the cartridge (a specific point on the shoulder, rim or case mouth, depending on the cartridge) and the rearmost (when chambered) plane of the case.

    All I can think of is cylinder gap, in this situation. The measurement Omnivore is referring to is "endshake", the movement along the axis of the cylinder pin.
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  9. #9
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    When I saw this thread I thought Wait What?

    there is no such thing as head space on a front stuffer or cap and ball revolvers.

    Now if you are wondering how far to seat the ball into the cylinders chamber then the top of the ball should not protrude past the top of the cylinder.
    after loading the charge you may have to add some filler to get the ball to seat flush with the top of the cylinder, I use cream of wheat,
    corn meal works good too then I seal in the balls to top off the cylinder with pariffin wax.
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  10. #10
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    Headspace on a C&B.....Well, there is a “space” but I don’t think “headspace” would be ‘quite’ correct term, but ALMOST amounts to the same thing.

    In a C&B revolver (clean) one should be able to hold the hammer down HARD on the empty nipple and be able to move the cylinder thru it’s entire endshake travel. You should NOT feel the nipple contact the hammer. If you do, then THAT CHAMBER needs to be addressed. The nipples should not contact the hammer.

    By the same token, with a cap SECURELY fitted to the nipple, the hammer lowered carefully, and the cylinder once again moved thru it’s entire range of endshake, the hammer should ALWAYS be in contact with the cap.

    The tolerances on a C&B revolver are VERY tight out of necessity.

    Chris

  11. #11
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    Nice

    I use cream of wheat,corn meal works good too then I seal in the balls to top off the cylinder with pariffin wax.
    "steward"

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