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Thread: black powder wannabee

  1. #1
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    black powder wannabee

    i dont know enough about it to ask the right question but,
    im intrested in getting a civil war replica cap & ball rifle/musket?
    maby someone could drop some names , callibers and price ranges.
    probably wont hunt with it, just make noise and smoke.
    i just think they look cool and im a civil war buff....thanks
    i'd rather be a hammer than a nail.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by bellyfat View Post
    i dont know enough about it to ask the right question but,
    im intrested in getting a civil war replica cap & ball rifle/musket?
    maby someone could drop some names , callibers and price ranges.
    probably wont hunt with it, just make noise and smoke.
    i just think they look cool and im a civil war buff....thanks

    Dixie Arms is the place to start online. 50 caliber makes enough noise and smoke to please the child of even advanced years.

  3. #3
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    1934 National Firearms Act, 1968 The Gun Control Act, 1986 Firearms Owners Protection Act, 1993 Brady Handguns Violence Act, 1994 Assault Weapons Ban, 1995 Gun Free School Zones Act, NO MORE COMPROMISING

  4. #4
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    thanks folks

    thanks for the directions, i;ll check them out
    i'd rather be a hammer than a nail.

  5. #5
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    Trackofthewolf.com is another great place to start.

    For Civil War era, you probably want a 58 caliber for Minnie Balls. A Zouave (made by various companies) or a 1861/63 Springfield is probably the best starting place.

  6. #6
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    I'm often asked how to get started into black powder shooting, and I tell people that the first requirement is commitment.
    Black powder guns require cleaning right away, and proper cleaning, or rust may quickly damage them beyond repair. Whether you use black powder, Pyrodex or 777, the propellant is corrosive.
    Are you the type that puts off cleaning your modern guns? Then black powder shooting is not for you.
    If you live in a humid area, cleaning must be done the same day to avoid rust. I live in the very dry Utah desert, and can get by for a few days without cleaning, but quick cleaning is still a must.
    Go into any pawn shop and you'll likely see black powder rifles, shotguns or revolvers that were fired and left uncleaned, left to rust. These were owned by folks who thought black powder shooting would be "cool," then balked at cleaning them right away.
    Eventually, they grew weary of the maintenance and stopped cleaning the gun altogether. More black powder guns are destroyed through neglect than any other factor.
    If you have the commitment to properly clean your black powder gun after using it, then it's a wonderful sport. If not, move on to a more modern gun that uses smokeless powder.
    "And therein did I see an ugly cat. Blue smoke. Brimstone. Holes in paper. And this ugly cat was much amused." --- the prophesies of Gatodamus (1503 - 1566).

  7. #7
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    I have an 1858 Enfield made by Parker Hale of Birmingham, England in the 1980s. A very nice rifle.
    Probably far too pricey for you, as a beginner. Parker Hale stopped producing these muzzleloading Enfields about 1990. People have awakened to how excellent they are.

    However, Navy Arms and Pietta make the 1858 Enfield. It lacks the progressive depth rifling as the originals and the Parker Hale reproductions, but as a first-time gun it should suit you fine.

    I prefer the Enfield over the Springfield because its sights are better, more refined. Others don't like the Enfield because it doesn't fit them as well as they hold it to the shoulder. It's an individual preference.

    The Enfield is authentic to the Civil War. The Union and Confederacy used an estimated 900,000 Enfields in the war. It would be authentic to either side.

    Either the Springfield or the Enfield will shoot patched, round ball for cheap plinking at tin cans. This saves you powder and lead.
    But both were designed for the Minie' ball. Unless you cast your own bullets, shooting Minie's can be expensive.
    The cheapest I've been able to purchase Minie' bullets online is about 37 cents each. I've seen some sites sell them for as much as 60 cents each!
    Bullets must be cast of pure lead, or very nearly pure, so they're dead-soft. This allows the hollow base to expand upon firing, to grip the rifling.

    Use black powder or Pyrodex RS. Hodgdon 777 is not really designed for use with Minie' bullets.

    Whatever rifle you get, clean it immediately after firing to avoid corrosion. Black powder and Pyrodex are corrosive and will rust steel in short order.

    These days, with inlines and other abominations filling the racks, it's hard to find a store that stocks the old, original style muzzleloaders. But I urge you to look, so you can put it to your shoulder and see which model feels best to you.

    While doing so, sure enough, some Slackjaw will wander by and say, "Ya know what ya need `stead of wunna them smokepoles ... ya need wunna them Blasphemy Arms Turbo ZX Fartzenthumpers with Zip-Wham sabot bullets and three Platinum Pellets! That's what ya need!"

    Completely disregard whatever this Slackjaw tells you. He has as much in common with real muzzleloading as a racehorse does with a seahorse.
    "And therein did I see an ugly cat. Blue smoke. Brimstone. Holes in paper. And this ugly cat was much amused." --- the prophesies of Gatodamus (1503 - 1566).

  8. #8
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    I had to go double check my gun safe when I saw that.

    Mine was a CVA kit offering. I built it about 1983. I still take it out and shoot it once in a while. Works pretty good with 30 gr of FFF and appropriate patched round ball.
    James

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