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Thread: Dumb Grampa, Smart Grandson, and Eddy Eagle

  1. #1
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    Dumb Grampa, Smart Grandson, and Eddy Eagle

    The bad news: Yesterday I committed an act of negligence that put my two grandsons at risk – something unthinkable to me.

    The good news: My oldest grandson (just turning 9) is smart, level-headed, and understands the rules.

    A little background: I have been having my oldest recite the Eddy Eagle rules since he was 4 years old, and insisted he index his trigger figure on the frame and not point the muzzle of his toy guns at anyone. I started him shooting with airsoft and paintball at 6 years, and started him off with an AR-.22 at 8.

    Yesterday, I had the boys (little brother is 18 months) at a park. After getting them strapped into the car, I realized I’d lost my sun-glasses case. The oldest offered to go look for them, but I knew it would be faster if I retrieved them because I knew where to look. I told him to stay in the car with his brother and I’d be right back.

    Distracted, I forgot the revolver in a pocket holster I’d placed in the unlocked glove box.

    I quickly retrieved the glasses case and got back in the car. The oldest asked, “Grampa, do you carry a gun in your car sometimes?”

    A little stunned, I looked at him and replied, “Yes I do sometimes. What would you do if you saw it – what are the Eddy Eagle rules?”

    “Stop…Don’t touch…Walk away…Tell a grownup.”

    “Perfect! You get a dollar for that!” It still hadn’t occurred to me what had happened.

    Then he asked slyly, “Is it in there? – pointing to the ashtray.

    “No.”

    “Is it in there?” – pointing to the center console.

    “No”…and then it dawned on me…”Did you look in the glove box?”

    “Yes, I was looking for your glasses case and saw your gun.”

    “What did you do then?”

    “I didn’t touch it…and I closed the glove box.”

    “And then you told me. You did EXACTLY the right thing. I’m very proud of you!”

    Then it hit me how stupid and negligent I’d been, and I drove on in silence.

    Noting my distress, he said, “It’s OK Grampa, nothing bad happened, I would never touch it without permission, and I won’t tell anyone.”

    Well, perhaps he won’t tell on me – but I will. There is no excuse for my lapse, and I won’t offer one. I offer this story because it illustrates how such a lapse can occur – even with the best of intentions. And it also illustrates that a kid who has been trained to treat guns with a little fear and a lot of respect – who understands how they work and why they are dangerous – is far safer than a child who knows nothing about them.

    The only thing I did right is to have a smart Grandson and use the Eddy Eagle program to give him a firm set of rules when encountering a firearm. I'll start the youngest even earlier.
    Last edited by rainbowbob; June 12th, 2013 at 12:07 AM.
    Best regards,
    Rainbowbob

  2. #2
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    Bob, that's the fifth fail-safe for the four rules: ALWAYS have someone around with the knowledge and courage to call you out on them.

    Good on your grandson; and maybe next time, lock the glove-box? Still, you get props for teaching him right--and that's one of the most important things, because that way even when we slip we have someone to remind us and get our heads back in the game.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by rainbowbob View Post
    The bad news: Yesterday I committed an act of negligence that put my two grandsons at risk – something unthinkable to me.
    The only way they would have been "at risk" would be from lack of training. From my read on the story, they were at no risk at all. We live in a dangerous world and you appear to have safe children. Your bragging is justified.

  4. #4
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    You didn't endanger your kids. If what you did endangered your kids then those who say guns must always be disassembled and locked in a safe at home are correct.
    "The only thing that stops a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun." - Wayne LaPierre
    Republicans: The Other Democratic Party

  5. #5
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    It is my personal policy to lock up any gun that is not in my personal control (e.g., the revolver in my pocket) when children are present.

    I failed to maintain my own standards (and there's no lock on the glove box).

    I don't suggest that is THE standard, and yours may differ for all kinds of valid reasons.

    My standard may change when my Grandsons are BOTH old enough and adequately trained to confidently handle firearms safely.

    The 9-year-old has already proven himself.
    Best regards,
    Rainbowbob

  6. #6
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    Then you certainly violated your own standards. But children trained in the use of guns have, many times, saved their own lives or the lives of others.

    I don't mean to question your grandkids behavior but you did bring this story to a public forum. You said you strapped your grandsons in and then left to find your sunglass case. Did you go out of sight of your grandsons while they were left alone in a vehicle? Why was your grandson in the front seat where he could search in your glovebox? Why did he unbuckle his seatbelt?

    I see other issues in this story besides leaving a gun in a closed compartment out of sight and out of reach from your grandsons.

    I leave guns in places where my grandchildren might find them if they go prying or to places they're not supposed to be. We know where the kids are and what they're doing most of the time but, kids being kids, they can get away from you sometimes. Luckily, your grandkids had the training to know what to do/not do when they see a gun. That saved them and you. Good for you for having trained them.
    "The only thing that stops a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun." - Wayne LaPierre
    Republicans: The Other Democratic Party

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