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Thread: Oleg On Handloading for PCC's

  1. #1
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    Oleg On Handloading for PCC's

    I just read an interesting article by Oleg Volk in "The Blue Press" October, 2017, catalogue about hand loading pistol caliber cartridges splined for carbines where it is near impossible to obtain a cartridge that will perform great in both a pistol and a carbine.

    Oleg, if you are out there, please post that article here as it is of great interest to us hand loaders who also ascribe to the utility of having pistol caliber carbines to go along with our pistols.

    Woody
    http://oklahomafirearmservices.com/
    If the ends sought cannot be achieved through the means granted to the Federal Government in the Constitution, there is neither a need nor the power for the Federal Government to get involved.. B.E.Wood

  2. #2
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    I've found that Unique under a 210-215 gr SWC works in all my .41s. 4", 6.5", 14" and 20" guns.

    CD
    De Oppresso Liber

    Iraq: 91,03-06,08, 09,15 & 16'
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  3. #3
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    CC - I am currently reloading .357 Magnum for a GP-100 and a Marlin 1894 levergun.
    According to the manual, Winchester 296 and Hodgdon H110 are the same powder.
    I'm using the 296 with a 158 gr. bullet. The manual calls for a MAX LOAD of 16.7 gr. of either powder, which gives you an MV of 1591 and 40,000 CUP.
    The manual calls for Winchester brass but I'm using both new Starline and used brass. The primers have been either CCI #550, Winchester WSPM (small pistol magnum), or Federal #200 ( also small pistol magnum). I have not noticed any difference between the primers/brass mix but I don't have a chronograph to see if there is a change.
    Life Member of both NRA and North American Hunting Club (huntingclub.com)
    “Crime is to be expected since humans are never perfect. But the failure of Justice may be more damaging to Society than the crime itself.” - - Clarence Darrow

  4. #4
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    JT

    I use the same 357 combo. I have a Marlin 1894C and a Ruger Security Six. I use Hogden Titegroup for the revolver ammo and Alliant 2400 for the carbine ammo. Sometimes I'll use Hogden Longshot or Alliant Bluedot for the carbine if that's what I have in the powder measure scale that I've been using loading other ammo.

    The only large caliber rifle ammo I load is 308 and 45-70. For convenience sake and to keep inventory simple, I use IMR 3031 in both.

    Woody
    http://oklahomafirearmservices.com/
    If the ends sought cannot be achieved through the means granted to the Federal Government in the Constitution, there is neither a need nor the power for the Federal Government to get involved.. B.E.Wood

  5. #5
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    Woody -
    the largest round I reload is for my .243 rifle.

    I had tried Federal, Remington, and Winchester 100 gr. factory ammo - with disappointing results. I was trying to set the gun up for a 200 yd. zero with a 3-9x scope and those bullets were hitting all over the paper.

    I got the gun used in the late 80s but the reloading manuals I read then were limited in their info. I was wanting to load 60 & 75 grain Sierra HPs as well as their 100 gr. "spitzer boattail" bullet. Most of the manuals only listed the 100 gr. loads (a couple listed 80) and NONE listed 60 gr. So I wrote to 8 of the powder manufacturers for their suggestions, but only even responded. One was really helpful and that was from Accurate Arms. I still kick myself for not saving that letter as it was signed by the then president of the company! Talk about "customer service"! One of the powders he recommended was the 2230, a semi-sperical ball type powder, originally designed for the smaller .223. This powder is a relatively fast burner and MAY cause more throat erosion in my .243's chamber but I can live with that.

    With the 100 gr. loads, the MAX was 33.5 gr. so I started at 31 and went by 1/2 grain steps. Best accuracy was 33-33.5 with no signs of over-pressure. Mind you, this was mixed brass, mostly used. Then I tried them by 1/4 gr. increments from 32.5-33.5, again with the best accuracy near 33.5 (MAX).

    Now my reloading press is a Lee "Progressive" and I'm using the "disc powder measure" set-up with two discs. The larger hole is on the bottom and, with a little jiggle of the die plate, I get 33.3 +/- 0.1 gr. When I tested these loads at 200 yds. (shooting off of sandbags), I shot one round at a time, lay the rifle down and loaded the next round, fired, and repeated. This meant that my "sight picture" changed on every shot. There were also no flags down range to help monitor the wind. Even so, I put 6 rounds into a 1.25" wide by 2.5" tall arc but a 7th round was a flyer that opened the whole thing up to about 2.5" overall.

    That was still a heck of a lot better than the factory loads I tried at first.
    Life Member of both NRA and North American Hunting Club (huntingclub.com)
    “Crime is to be expected since humans are never perfect. But the failure of Justice may be more damaging to Society than the crime itself.” - - Clarence Darrow

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by JTHunter View Post
    Woody -
    the largest round I reload is for my .243 rifle.

    I had tried Federal, Remington, and Winchester 100 gr. factory ammo - with disappointing results. I was trying to set the gun up for a 200 yd. zero with a 3-9x scope and those bullets were hitting all over the paper.

    I got the gun used in the late 80s but the reloading manuals I read then were limited in their info. I was wanting to load 60 & 75 grain Sierra HPs as well as their 100 gr. "spitzer boattail" bullet. Most of the manuals only listed the 100 gr. loads (a couple listed 80) and NONE listed 60 gr. So I wrote to 8 of the powder manufacturers for their suggestions, but only even responded. One was really helpful and that was from Accurate Arms. I still kick myself for not saving that letter as it was signed by the then president of the company! Talk about "customer service"! One of the powders he recommended was the 2230, a semi-sperical ball type powder, originally designed for the smaller .223. This powder is a relatively fast burner and MAY cause more throat erosion in my .243's chamber but I can live with that.

    With the 100 gr. loads, the MAX was 33.5 gr. so I started at 31 and went by 1/2 grain steps. Best accuracy was 33-33.5 with no signs of over-pressure. Mind you, this was mixed brass, mostly used. Then I tried them by 1/4 gr. increments from 32.5-33.5, again with the best accuracy near 33.5 (MAX).

    Now my reloading press is a Lee "Progressive" and I'm using the "disc powder measure" set-up with two discs. The larger hole is on the bottom and, with a little jiggle of the die plate, I get 33.3 +/- 0.1 gr. When I tested these loads at 200 yds. (shooting off of sandbags), I shot one round at a time, lay the rifle down and loaded the next round, fired, and repeated. This meant that my "sight picture" changed on every shot. There were also no flags down range to help monitor the wind. Even so, I put 6 rounds into a 1.25" wide by 2.5" tall arc but a 7th round was a flyer that opened the whole thing up to about 2.5" overall.

    That was still a heck of a lot better than the factory loads I tried at first.
    Different cases and even differing primers can have a notable effect on accuracy, but not so much as inconsistent powder charges.

    I'm a bit anal when it comes to measuring powder. I weigh each and every charge on my Lyman 1200 DPS 3.

    Getting six of seven rounds into 1.25 wide by 2.5 inches tall box at 200 yards is excellent - especially for a gun that has an indeterminate number of rounds through it. You are right around one minute of angle!

    Keep up the good work!

    Woody

    PS: I didn't know there were that many powder manufacturers!)
    http://oklahomafirearmservices.com/
    If the ends sought cannot be achieved through the means granted to the Federal Government in the Constitution, there is neither a need nor the power for the Federal Government to get involved.. B.E.Wood

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by ConstitutionCowboy View Post
    Different cases and even differing primers can have a notable effect on accuracy, but not so much as inconsistent powder charges.

    I'm a bit anal when it comes to measuring powder. I weigh each and every charge on my Lyman 1200 DPS 3.

    Getting six of seven rounds into 1.25 wide by 2.5 inches tall box at 200 yards is excellent - especially for a gun that has an indeterminate number of rounds through it. You are right around one minute of angle!

    Keep up the good work!

    Woody

    PS: I didn't know there were that many powder manufacturers!
    Thanks.
    As for the powder companies, there AREN'T as many as there used to be.
    Life Member of both NRA and North American Hunting Club (huntingclub.com)
    “Crime is to be expected since humans are never perfect. But the failure of Justice may be more damaging to Society than the crime itself.” - - Clarence Darrow

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