Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: Pre WWII 30-06 ammo

  1. #1

    Pre WWII 30-06 ammo

    Tied into a stash, from one handfull found:
    1 ea FA 18
    1 ea FA 33
    1 ea FA 43
    61 ea FA 38

    Mix of Red, green, blue and no color tips

    I was going to shoot it up, bue a friend said it may have value.

    Where can I find the value of this stuff?

  2. #2
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    12-24-02
    Location
    Clifton, CO USA
    Posts
    144

    Post

    mobjacker, try visiting the link below. People their should be able to give you a good idea on value.

    http://cartridgecollectors.org/

    Hope this helps!

    Steve Mace
    After today it's all historical.

  3. #3
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    12-24-02
    Location
    Arizona Territory
    Posts
    311
    Might mean;

    Red = Tracer
    Green = HE/Frag
    Blue = Incend
    Plain = Ball

    As mentioned, don't shoot em, you might have something that collectors will pay you for. Then you can buy fresh ammo.
    Clem

    Retired USMC, Retired LEO
    Benefactor NRA, Life DAV

  4. #4
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    05-17-03
    Location
    London, Ont.
    Posts
    6,007
    Corrosively primed collector stuff. It's all Frankford Arsenal made ammo. Collectors might buy it. Most want full, unopened, boxes.
    The blue tipped incendiaries are illegal. Made to start fires. Don't even think about shooting it.

  5. #5
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    04-13-04
    Location
    Tampa Bay area
    Posts
    1,371
    The SROs don't like you shooting API at the long range, but don't mind you using them at the 50 yard line. Incendiaries don't light that close. Niether do tracers.
    API and blue tip are available in the Gunshine State the last time I checked. I don't think it is a good idea to shoot that stuff up for historical reasons, not legal ones.

  6. #6
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    04-21-06
    Location
    Colorado Springs
    Posts
    623
    Do not fire the FA18 and FA33 in an M1. You will bend the operating rod.

    The FA38 is iffy.

    All are corrosive rounds.

  7. #7
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    12-31-02
    Location
    Long Beach, People's Democratic Socialist Republic of California
    Posts
    1,428
    The two digit numbers mean year of manufacture; as in 1918, 1933 and so on.

    The color coding is pretty universal in the U. S. inventory as noted by others. You didn't list any black tip, that is armor piercing. As P5 Guy suggested, it's probably worth more to cartridge collectors than it is as blasting and plinking ammo.

    Do at least check with Cartridge Collector sites. They do prefer full, unopened boxes, but they'll take loose rounds too. (Full unopened boxes are worth more.)
    My opinion; guaranteed worth twice what you paid for it.
    Archie
    Please check out my journal at http://archiepreacher.livejournal.com/

  8. #8
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    11-20-09
    Posts
    202
    Do not fire the FA18 and FA33 in an M1. You will bend the operating rod.
    First time I ever heard of this. Please enlighten me. How does this happen? And why those two years in particular? (And I am being serious.)
    "Never judge a man until you've walked a mile in his shoes; Then you're a mile away and you have his shoes." --Fenton J. Pennypacker III

  9. #9
    by my opinion the answer is correct by Archie Senior Member. but up to you because there are also many other ways to chose so just you can get lot of helps through google.

  10. #10
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    06-29-07
    Posts
    1,406
    Quote:
    Do not fire the FA18 and FA33 in an M1. You will bend the operating rod.

    First time I ever heard of this. Please enlighten me. How does this happen? And why those two years in particular? (And I am being serious.)
    The M1 Garand was built to handle M2 ammo, which is a specific pressure/power to work with the Garands gas system. The ammo in question is M1 type ammo, which is hotter and produces too much pressure for the Garands gas system, and will possibly bend the operating rod, and maybe crack the receiver. You shouldn't use commercial hunting ammo in Garands for the same reason.

    Now, you can buy adjustable gas plugs for the Garand that will prevent this damage, they don't cost much, but a lot of folks don't know this or do it. Most people consider .30-06 to be .30-06. That old ammo of yours is from the era when there were only bolt-action rifles and machineguns, no gas semi-autos.

    I personally wouldn't shoot it anyway, I like to collect the old stuff. I've got some 1918 '06 ammo in 5rd. clips paid for and on the way, and some WWII .45acp coming too. I wouldn't expect you'd get more than $5 a round for them at the most, if even close to that. But I look for deals, I'm not a serious collector.

  11. #11
    Senior Member  
    Join Date
    12-29-02
    Location
    On the Road, somewhere in the good ol' U.S. of A.
    Posts
    1,526
    Actually, your FA-18 rounds are original .30-06 cartridges, firing a 150-gr flat-based cupronickel jacketed bullet at ~2700 FPS. You shouldn't have any problem shooting them in your Garand if you want to, but I would see what a collector would give you for them first.

    The FA-33 rounds are M1 Ball cartridges, which fired a 174-gr boat-tailed bullet at ~2640 FPS. It was designed to extend the range of the .30-06 for indirect machinegun and rifle fire, albeit at a penalty of increased recoil. By 1938, the mortar had replaced massed infantry/machinegun fire for indirect fire, so the Army again changed the rifle/machinegun round, to the M2 Ball round, which used a 152-gr flat-based gilding metal jacketed bullet at ~2700 FPS. This cartridge is the one around which the M1 Garands were produced, so your ammo headstamped FA-43 would be M2 Ball rounds, suitable for shooting in your Garand. All your ammo is corrosive primed, so you would need to clean your rifle with water if you decide to shoot it.

    As has been mentioned, your FA-38 rounds are likely M2 ball, but could be M1 ball. If you decide to shoot them, pull a bullet from one of them first. If it's flat based, it's OK to shoot in a Garand. If boat-tailed, it's too hot for the Garand without the modifications to the gas port previously mentioned.
    Violence is an ugly thing, but not the ugliest of things. The decayed and degraded state of moral and valorous feeling which believes that nothing is worth violence is much worse. Those who have nothing for which they are willing to fight; nothing they care about more than their own personal safety; are miserable creatures who have no chance of being free, unless made and kept so by the exertions of those better than themselves. Gary L. Griffiths, Chief Instructor, Advanced Force Tactics, Inc. (Paraphrasing John Stuart Mill)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •