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Thread: FMJ how they do it?

  1. #1
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    FMJ how they do it?

    Was beating this around for a while, I have reloaded my own for several years, and even poured lead for my SmokeSticks. Never gave much thought into how a FMJ round is made. Lead or other substance into the brass/bronze sleeve ???

  2. #2
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    there are people out there that make their own jacket rounds, I have checked into some what. It seems that a few use spent ctgs, and they swag lead (some use lead wire) up into the spent ctg in a bullet swagging die to be used on a reloading press. The swagging die will form the jacket bullet and swag (squeeze) the lead into form machined into the die. i.e. pointed bullet, round nose bullet.

    But I try to keep my long guns in 2 calibers; .308 and 8mm mauser. And realy have not found a spent ctg yet that I could get into swagging my own jacketed rounds. But I am always looking into making myself for self sufficient for reloading.

    * already setting up for making my own black powder.
    * trying to find a cheap source of lead to to start casting my own bullets.
    *Once I start smelting and casting, I can further expand into swagging my own jacketed bullets
    * already converting berdan primed brass into boxer brass, mainley 8mm mauser. 8x57 boxer brass is expensive, and the berdan is a free pick up on the range, just takes alittle time for doing the conversion.

    yoop
    Real Naval Gunners Hit Harder, and Penetrate Deeper, and just as accurate without Fire Control!

  3. #3
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    You can also use copper tubing for the jackets. Spent .22 LR cases can be used to make thin jackets for .224 diameter bullets.

    Corbin makes swaging equipment and has quite a bit of information up.

    You can swage plain lead bullets and avoid some of the headaches associated with casting.
    Si vis pacem, para bellum

  4. #4
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    Jacket inverted and bullet swaged with open base closed point...
    Sincerely,

    Hobie
    Shooting with Hobie

  5. #5
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    In regular manufacturing, the jacket metal (copper or a cupronickel alloy) is formed into a cup shape under pressure, then the lead is either poured in hot, or it's pushed in solid leaving, as stated above, an open base. Hollow points and softpoints are formed in similar fashion, but the lead core is inserted from the top and the top is then swaged (pressure formed in a die) to form the ogive, leaving the open tip.

    To create a "totally" metal jacketed bullet, the formed lead core is electro-plated with copper to build the jacket onto the lead. This leaves no exposed lead at either end.

    Using the open base "FMJ" you can still get barrel leading due to the exposed base melting in the high pressure as it's being forced down the tube. Using hollowpoints or TMJs eliminates that problem.

    Some comm bloc jackets are copper plated mild steel, and sometimes mistaken for steel core bullets due to their attraction to magnets (there are steel core bullets but not all that attract a magnet are steel core). Bullets containing steel should be used with more caution as they've been known to start fires in extreme conditions.

  6. #6
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    Thanks, already have a much better understanding of process. Not that I will ever need to know the how to's but still one of those things that make you go Hmm.

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