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Thread: Saturday Morning; Unknown Revolver

  1. #1
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    Saturday Morning; Unknown Revolver

    A friend wants to sell this, and I don't even know what it is, or what caliber it is chambered for. It is in good shape. All I had on hand was a fired .44 Special case, which will almost enter the chamber, though the cylinder is obviously way too short for it. I could make no other measurements, but the .44 Webley or .44 Bulldog cartridges are the only ones that seem to be good candidates.

    The markings appear to be either Spanish or Portugese. The ejector rod swivels out in a manner similar to the Nagant revolvers.

    Any information as to history, use, caliber would be appreciated.

    "You don't pay back, you pay forward."

  2. #2
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    What are the markings? Where are the markings? I have a wild guess but a little more info would be good before I put my foot in my mouth.
    1934 National Firearms Act, 1968 The Gun Control Act, 1986 Firearms Owners Protection Act, 1993 Brady Handguns Violence Act, 1994 Assault Weapons Ban, 1995 Gun Free School Zones Act, NO MORE COMPROMISING

  3. #3
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    There are no markings on the left side. On the right side, it says, "Guardia Finanzia". There is a light stamp which says rip 1932. Their is a 4 digit number on the right side of the frame. The sideplate is on the left. There is a 3 digit number on the bottom of the barrel, visible when you rotate the ejector rod to the ejection position.

    The seal on the left hand side is a square type cross on a shield, with a crown on top of that, with a more conventional type cross on top of that.

    There is also a pb stamped on the frame.

    I wish my camera was better, and I wish I had had my calipers with me. Here is another picture, with a fired .44 Special case laying alongside the cylinder.

    "You don't pay back, you pay forward."

  4. #4
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    The gun's Italian.

    The Guardia di Finanza (Italian pronunciation: [ˈɡwardja di fiˈnantsa]; meaning "Finance Police") is an Italian police force under the authority of the Minister of Economy and Finance. As it retains military status, like the Carabinieri, it is part of the Italian Armed Forces.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guardia_di_Finanza

    It's a Glisenti Model 1889 Italian Service Revolver.

    Attachment 88690

    http://www.joesalter.com/detail.php?f_qryitem=9463

    http://jtjersey.com/Glisenti/Glisenti.htm

    http://www.collectorsfirearms.com/ad...p?itemID=31803
    Last edited by mesinge2; February 28th, 2010 at 11:37 AM.
    "There are three and only three ways to reform our Congressional legislation, familiarly called, the ballot box, the jury box, and the cartridge box".
    - Stephen Decatur Miller (May 8, 1787 March 8, 1838)

  5. #5
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    Thanks mesinge2!

    I have reached the same conclusion, using a couple of the same sources you show. Also, a little bit deeper study of Cartridges of the World.

    177 grain bullet at 810 FPS. It wasn't too bad of a cartridge for its time.
    "You don't pay back, you pay forward."

  6. #6
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    "There are three and only three ways to reform our Congressional legislation, familiarly called, the ballot box, the jury box, and the cartridge box".
    - Stephen Decatur Miller (May 8, 1787 March 8, 1838)

  7. #7
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    Good catch, my eyeballs kept saying Italian but I was looking for Spanish guns.

    I didn't recognize the proof mark though and I couldn't find it under any country in my book. The pb probably means it was proofed for black powder. I have a picture of what looks like that same gun being fired and it is a 10.4 MM. I guess you could call it a 44 spcl short since its shorter than a regular 44 spcl case.
    1934 National Firearms Act, 1968 The Gun Control Act, 1986 Firearms Owners Protection Act, 1993 Brady Handguns Violence Act, 1994 Assault Weapons Ban, 1995 Gun Free School Zones Act, NO MORE COMPROMISING

  8. #8
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    I have a habit of buying odd-ball calibers, so I am used to looking for odd-ball guns and the ammo they use.
    "There are three and only three ways to reform our Congressional legislation, familiarly called, the ballot box, the jury box, and the cartridge box".
    - Stephen Decatur Miller (May 8, 1787 March 8, 1838)

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