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Thread: Tell me about my uncle's S&W revolver (thread three)

  1. #1
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    Tell me about my uncle's S&W revolver (thread three)

    Please educate me better about my uncle's inheritance. It is an S&W .38

    Unfortunately my grandfather died Tuesday, 10/5/10. He was 92. He was a WWII aviator who was responsible for training thousands of WWII fighter pilots. His last flight was in 06 (He was 88) in a homebuilt ultra-light. He had been airborne for over 70 years.

    This one my Uncle got, and I told him I would dig around for him. I know Jack about revolvers.

    Thanks.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Jahwarrior said: I could've given them my ID, but I am right, and obstinate about being so. so, yes,I could've ended it by just cooperating, but that would have hypocritical, lazy, and cowardly.

  2. #2
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    The illustrated revolver is a Smith & Wesson Military and Police Hand Ejector.
    It may be .38 Special, it may be .38 S&W (.38/200 British) from a wartime contract, or it might be a .38 S&W that the British reamed out to accept .38 Special for easier surplus sale in the Colonies.
    A listing of all markings would help tell which it is.

    The barrel has been cut off and the front sight relocated, but the front extractor rod latch was lost in the process. The gun was nickel plated by an outside shop, S&W does not plate hammers and triggers. The grips are "Magna" type, probably of much later production than the gun. Resale value is low.
    I have a few facts and a lot of opinions.

  3. #3
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    I will get with my uncle and see what I can get on the markings. Thanks for the help!
    Jahwarrior said: I could've given them my ID, but I am right, and obstinate about being so. so, yes,I could've ended it by just cooperating, but that would have hypocritical, lazy, and cowardly.

  4. #4
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    With that serial number it is quite likely it's a British Service Revolver from around 1941 that has been bored out to .38 Special. Simplest way to check it is see if a .38 special will chamber, if it does, but is a loose fit at the rear of the cylinder, then it was originally a .38 S&W. The .38 S&W is a trapered case and slightly wider than the .38 special at the rim.
    If it is a rechambered gun only shoot standard velocity lead ammunition through it as higher pressure loads may result in cartridges bulging and potentially splitting where they are not properly supported. Shooting PlusP ammunition may result in the crane springing as well as it lacks the front locking lug. I managed to do this with a S&W Model 60 that had a custom barrel and no locking lug in less than a packet of ammo.
    These older guns also lack the internal hammer block safety that was developed in 1944 after a fatality when a gun was dropped on its hammer. It would be prudent to leave the chamber under the hammer empty if the gun is kept loaded.
    If you're 6'4" 360, with the scraggly beard wearing a kilt, I think you can leave the guns at home. Just throw on your tartan, grab the nearest sledgehammer, and chase the bad guy down on foot while yelling "REMEMBER WILLIAM WALLACE!!!" If he stops before he hits the state line, splatter him - MGshaggy

  5. #5
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    You might just try reading the side of the barrel, or what is left of it.

    Does it say .38 S&W Ctg.

    Or does it say .38 S&W Special Ctg.

    Buckshot

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