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Thread: Need Info

  1. #1
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    Need Info

    Have a gun that i would like some info on. It"s a 22 rifle on the barrel it reads as follows Lake Field Mossberg MARK I SINGLE SHOT 22 CAL S.L. LR. MADE BY LAKEFIELD ARMS LTD. Think the serial# is 400. Curious as to why a bolt action rifle has a manually pulled firing pin assembly

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    My old Savage/Stevens is the same. Call it a safety feature, you can load and it's still safe till you manually cock it. It also made the firing mechanism easier and cheaper to make.


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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Old Grump
    Call it a safety feature, you can load and it's still safe till you manually cock it.
    "Safer" than fully cocked, I'd think.

    The gun can still go off if it happens to fall on the cocking knob.
    "Tactical" is a mindset, not an equipment list.

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    The .22 I got when I was 14 had that same cocking feature.
    Single shot, needed to be cocked by pulling out the center knob until it locked.
    My folks got it from JC Penney (or Sears) 50 yrs ago, and I still have it.
    Even though it wasn't drop safe, back then we didn't drop our rifles, and I never shot my sister either.

  5. #5
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    "Safer" than fully cocked, I'd think.

    The gun can still go off if it happens to fall on the cocking knob.
    Well it's had from 1964 to now for that to happen and it hasn't yet. I doubt there is enough energy in a drop for that to happen it would have to be deliberately pounded and considering the location of the knob that wouldn't be easy. I suppose a complete moron with a hammer could make it so but I think anybody willing to do that will have already figured out some other way to take himself out of the gene pool.
    1934 National Firearms Act, 1968 The Gun Control Act, 1986 Firearms Owners Protection Act, 1993 Brady Handguns Violence Act, 1994 Assault Weapons Ban, 1995 Gun Free School Zones Act, NO MORE COMPROMISING

  6. #6
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    A lot of youth models had that as a safety feature. I believe the modern Crickett guns for youths still operate that way:

    http://www.crickett.com/

    Note cocking knobs in the photo beneath the big Keystone" logo on the left.

    Many military rifles had a cocking knob to allow the soldier to recock without opening the bolt to re-strike a bad primer, viz:

    http://www.nationalmatcharmory.com/RIA326017-A.JPG

    While the Springfield action was borrowed from the Mauser action (which did not have a cocking knob) prevailing military wisdom in the US was to add it to the design for the Springfield, as well as a magazine cutoff.

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  7. #7
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    Lake Field was taken over by Savage in 1994 ( Thanks to Canada's gun laws.) Most single shot youth rifles have a separate cocking devise. That is so a separate action must be taken to arm and fire the weapon. It is a standard safety feature. I grew up with a Stevens/Savage 15A. The way that little sucker was designed it would take a sledge hammer to fire it accidentally, unless the stock was removed there was no way it could drop on the cocking knob.

  8. #8
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    My first .22 (IIRC 1964) was a Springfield 120A (made by Savage) identical to the gun in the photo. Manual cocking was considered a safety feature. Loaded uncocked for singleshot bolt action rifle was supposed to be safer than loaded, cocked, safety on as with most boltaction rifles.
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